Want to become a member?  

2019 Quality in Construction

“The asphalt pavement industry is committed to building high-quality projects that deliver superior performance to the traveling public. All contractors’ projects earning a Quality in Construction award are measured against best practices designed to live up to that commitment,” said 2019 NAPA Chairman John Harper. 

For 2019, 354 projects were honored with a Quality in Construction Award. 

 

Details on the winners and their projects follow.

 

2014QICCollage 

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

Colorado

Connecticut

Florida

Georgia

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Missouri

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

South Carolina

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia 

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin       

 


ALABAMA

Dunn Construction Co. Inc. of Birmingham, Ala.

• Work on I-59 in Jefferson County. This mill-and-fill project required careful coordination to maximize productivity each shift, as construction was performed under restricted work hours. Between 15-20 percent reclaimed asphalt was used in the stone matrix asphalt wearing course, while between 25-35 percent was used in the other mixes for base, binder, patching, leveling and widening courses.

• Mill and overlay of Messer Airport Highway in Jefferson County. This was a mill and fill project that required precise scheduling of crews to maximize productivity on each shift and to minimize disruptions at a heavily used railroad crossing. To conserve natural resources, Dunn Construction Co. used reclaimed asphalt pavement in some pavement mixes and incorporated steel slag and blast furnace slag in the wearing surface designs.

• Work on the REI Parking Lot in Birmingham, Ala. The company milled 1 inch of existing asphalt and then placed a 1-inch seal coat. Crews had to perform hours of handwork to place the asphalt mix in tight areas and achieve the desired smoothness. Using an innovative material delivery solution (Fleetwatcher), Dunn Construction was able to increase its productivity and measure key performance indicators as it worked.

• Work on construction of 1.13 miles of roadway for Tattersall Park, a commercial, office and residential development in Shelby County. The company used an innovative material delivery system to increase productivity, measure performance, improve asphalt quality and track truck drivers' efficiency and safety. Dunn Construction Co. incorporated the maximum allowed percentages of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in each mix, used steel slag in the wearing surface and porous asphalt in one mix.

• Mill and overlay of US 78 in Jefferson County. To fill the areas milled on each shift, the company had to work closely with the planning subcontractor on the scheduling of crews to maximize productivity. Dunn Construction Co. used the maximum allowed percentages of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes to limit the use of virgin aggregates and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It also incorporated steel slag in the wearing surface designs.

• Mill and overlay of various roads in Mountain Brook, Ala. Project challenges included the high volume of traffic plus the numerous shops, restaurants, boutiques and businesses in the area. The company used an innovative material delivery system, Fleetwatcher, to increase productivity, measure performance and increase the quality of the asphalt pavement.

 

 

Midsouth Paving Inc., A CRH Co., of Birmingham, Ala.

• Work on Highway 84 West in Conecuh County. The company placed a thin lift of asphalt mix on the road.

• Work on I-59 in Tuscaloosa County, Ala. Two rest areas were included in this mill-and-overlay project, which featured a 19 mm Superpave binder course and a 12.5 mm stone matrix open-grade friction course. The rest areas included numerous wheelchair ramps, scrub seal, micro surfacing, and asphalt repairs. Almost 53,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete the work.

• Work on Northwest Alabama Regional Airport Runway 11-29 in Muscle Shoals, Ala. This rural area airport runway was closed during the mill and overlay project, which included full-depth replacement, signage replacement, drainage work and permanent stripe placement. Crews worked under a tight deadline and coordinated with subcontractors to complete the job ahead of schedule. Asphalt courses included a 3-inch P-403 leveling base and a ½-inch P-401 surface lift.

• Mill and overlay of 3.2 miles of SR 1 in Cleburne County. A good portion of the road goes over Cheaha Mountain and has steep grades and curves. To improve traction, the company placed an open grade friction course on this section.

 

 

Midsouth Paving Inc., A CRH Co., of Dothan, Ala.

 • Work on 8 miles of Highway 12 in Coffee County. Working with a variety of subcontractors and the Alabama Department of Transportation, the company milled the road and then placed a ¾-inch binder course and a ½-inch asphalt surface course.

• Work on the Highway 167 Bypass in Coffee County. Working with a variety of subcontractors and the Alabama Department of Transportation, the company milled the road and then placed a ¾-inch binder course and a ½-inch asphalt surface course.

• Work on 7 miles of Highway 248 in Coffee County, Ala. Working with subcontractors, the company milled the road and then paved it with a ¾-inch asphalt surface.

• Mill and overlay of SH 123 in Dale County. Working with the Alabama Department of Transportation and various contractors, the company milled, widened, leveled and overlaid the road.

• Work on SH 123 in Newton, Ala. The company worked with the Alabama Department of Transportation and several subcontractors to mill, level, widen and place an overlay on the road.

• Work on 8 miles of SH 51 in Barbour County. The company partnered with the Alabama Department of Transportation and subcontractors to mill, level and widen the road before placing a new asphalt surface.

Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Guntersville, Ala.
  • Work on 5.31 miles of SR 36 in Morgan County, Alabama. The company milled, leveled, and resurfaced the road, which had three super-elevated curves that required leveling.
 
Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Huntsville, Ala.
  • Work on 5.31 miles of SR 36 in Morgan County, Alabama. The company milled, leveled, and resurfaced the road, which had three super-elevated curves that required leveling.
Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Montgomery, Ala.
  • · Work on Greenville Airport Runway in Greenville, Ala. This full-depth pavement work in rural Butler County, Ala., required the airport to be closed during construction. Crews worked fast to lay down a 2.5-inch full-depth recycle asphalt aggregate base course and two lifts of a two-inch P-401 asphalt surface layer. The paving equipment was specially fitted to achieve slope and elevational requirements.

    · Work on almost 3 miles of I-65 in Montgomery County. The company removed and replaced an open graded friction course on a multi-lane interstate with several drop lanes and exits.

    Contact at Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc., Mike Murphree, (334) 356-2560,

    mmurphree@wiregrassconstruction.com

    · Mill and overlay of a section of the Alabama River Parkway in Montgomery, Ala. Since this is a toll road, the company had to coordinate all work closely with the toll authority. Heavy truck traffic from a quarry within the project limits further complicated the work.

    · Work on 1.2 miles of West South Boulevard in Montgomery County. Working at night, the company milled sections of the road and repaved it during the same shift to limit traffic disruption.

    Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Pelham, Ala.

    Contact at Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc., Tyler Yelverton, (205) 620-4132,

    tyelverton@wiregrassconstruction.com

    · Work on CR 17 in Shelby County. The project included milling, widening, leveling and placement of a treatment and an asphalt surface. The company also installed new guardrails at the Norfolk Southern railway crossings.

    · Work on CR 51 in Chilton County. The project involved 6 inches of treatment, which included patching, widening, leveling and placement of a surface course.

    · Work on SR 22 in Chilton County. The scope of work included widening, patching, super elevation and cross slope correction, milling, paving and guardrail installation on the Costa River bridge. The company laid a 2-inch asphalt surface layer.

    Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc. of Red Level, Ala.

    Contact at Wiregrass Construction Co. Inc., Brian Stuckey, (334) 648-5176, bstuckey@wiregrassconstruction.com

    · Work on overlay of 11.5 miles of SR 29 North in Andalusia, Ala. The company used the maximum allowable reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the asphalt mixes for the project, conserving natural resources. Despite late winter/early spring storms.

    ALASKA

    Exclusive Paving, North Pole, Alaska
     

    · Work on the Danby-Wembley Roundabout and Wembley Avenue in Fairbanks, Alaska. The company employed multiple traffic plans, several night closures and a public information campaign to keep traffic moving to the Alaska Railroad station, freight operations, schools and businesses in the area. Exclusive Paving used a special asphalt mix to increase the road's structural integrity, and limited the project's impact to workers and the environment by using 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and warm-mix asphalt.

    Granite Construction Co., Alaska Branch, Anchorage, Alaska

     

    · Work on resurfacing of 1.3 miles of Fifth and Sixth Avenues in Anchorage, Alaska. These are heavily traveled roads with three travel lanes in each direction, four signalized intersections and busy commercial businesses. Working from July through September, Granite milled and paved the roads while limiting disruption to traffic. The company used a joint heater to improve longitudinal joins.

    · Work on Rabbit Creek Road in Anchorage, Alaska. The project combined sections of new construction and rehabilitation and drainage improvements. It was the first project from Alaska DOT to apply two layers of pre-coated aggregate surface course, which serves as an additional wearing course and provides added traction during frigid winters. With carefully planned traffic control, well-executed safety and work plans and attention to scheduling.

    · Sterling Highway in Kasilof, Alaska. This rural 21-mile project consisted of widening the highway's shoulder from 3.5 feet to eight feet. A material-transfer vehicle was used on the narrow paving area to place the asphalt treated base. Once the first lift of base was placed, the project used belly dumps and a pickup machine to place the final 2-inch lift of Type IIA asphalt mix.

    · Sterling Highway in Sterling, Alaska. This highway was fully reconstructed for 21 miles to include 5.8 new miles of an additional passing lane and widening the highway's shoulders to eight feet. Careful planning was needed to account for commercial and recreational fishing in the area, including temporarily pausing construction the entire month of July 2019 for dip-netting. The paving work was completed in two lifts with the maximum amount of reclaimed asphalt pavement used in the mixes

    ARIZONA

    Granite Construction Co. of Tucson, Ariz.
     

    · Work on reconstruction of sections of five roads in Tucson, Ariz. To minimize the construction schedule, the company worked on multiple locations at the same time, always trying to maintain at least one lane of traffic in each direction. The project also included the striping of bike lanes, ramp upgrades for ADA accessibility and paved multi-use paths for pedestrians. Granite Construction used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and a binder with recycled tire rubber in the asphalt mixes, conserving natural resources.

    ARKANSAS

    Delta Asphalt of Arkansas Inc., of Paragould, Ark.

     

    · Work on 7.6 miles of US 62 in rural Sharp County. The company milled the road and then placed a two-inch overlay of Superpave asphalt on all five lanes using rollers with intelligent compaction to achieve the desired smoothness. Delta Asphalt incorporated 29 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes and used a production method that required less energy, conserving natural resources and limiting greenhouse gas emissions.

    Rogers Group Inc. of Conway, Ark.

    · Work on Highway 367 in White County. The project included the rehabilitation of the shoulders, an overlay of the entire roadway, and repair of the deck of a bridge over Highway 67. The company completed the work on time and on budget while maintaining an excellent safety record and minimizing traffic disruptions.

    · Work on approximately 4.5 miles of Tyler Street in Conway, Ark. The scope of work included placement of patching, milling and an asphalt overlay, as well as the installation of sidewalks and drainage structures. The project zone included multiple schools, major intersections and large subdivisions, so the company accelerated the work schedule to complete the work before school reopened. It also worked at night on the major intersections to minimize traffic congestion.

    CALIFORNIA

    Granite Construction Co. of Bakersfield, Calif.

    · Work on Meadows Field Airport Runway 12L-30R in Bakersfield, Calif. This urban reconstruction project faced problems from the start, as it was discovered that the design surface model did not match existing grades, a holdover problem from the previous contractor. The runway was then surveyed and the design surface model adjusted. The grade adjustments were achieved using variable depth cold planing and asphalt leveling when possible. The finished grade was within .02' tolerance.

    · Work on Route 395 in rural Lone Pine, Calif. The company milled 2.8 miles of the existing asphalt pavement and placed an overlay asphalt mix that included 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Using RAP and reusing the milled asphalt from this road in another project conserved natural resources.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 58 in Kern County. The company worked with Caltrans to change the mix design with minimal impact to the project schedule. To maintain commuter traffic to nearby Edwards Air Force Base, Granite kept on/off ramps open unless crews were actively working there. The company employed sustainable practices, using 25 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in some project mixes and employing the same trucks to haul away grindings and bring asphalt to the site

    Granite Construction Co. of Carlsbad, Calif.

    · Work on San Diego International Airport Taxiways. This urban reconstruction project was performed between the hours of midnight and 5 a.m., with the airport's sole runway operational by morning to maintain uninterrupted airport operations. A total of seven cross taxiways were milled and paved to meet and reestablish strict vertical grade drop-off requirements each night. All FAA placement quality requirements were achieved, including compaction, joint compaction, straight-edge smoothness, as well as thickness and grade tolerance

    Granite Construction Co. of Fresno, Calif.

    · Work on I-5 in Huron, Calif. This urban project involved ¼-inch milling of the existing roadway, removing failed concrete panels and finishing with a 0.15-inch base course and a 0.10-inch rubberized hot-mix asphalt layer. Reclaimed asphalt pavement was used in all hot-mix asphalt designs, and placing GPS tracking on the asphalt trucks helped improve efficiency. A Granite Construction inertial profile truck monitored smoothness. An accelerated schedule was bid to shorten the project's duration.

    · Work on urban Route 99 in Chowchilla, Calif. This project rehabilitated 6.7 miles of both northbound and southbound Route 99 using sonar technology on its pavers and making use of the company's own high-speed inertial profile truck. Crews milled 0.35-inches of the existing asphalt, removed failed concrete pavement panels and bridge approach slabs and then placed two lifts over the milled surface. Safety upgrades included adding metal beam guard railing, electrical work and striping. All construction was completed at night to alleviate traffic congestion.

    Granite Construction Co. of Indio, Calif.

    · Work on repaving of the race track at Barber Motorsports Park in Jefferson County. It brought in 28 craft employees from different offices and mobilized equipment from seven different states to handle the job. Work included installation of a porous asphalt layer under the base for drainage, milling and placement of aggregate base and asphalt pavement. The company used a unique approach to longitudinal joints to increase their longevity and increase the road's smoothness. Despite challenging weather conditions.

    · Work on Box Canyon Road in Mecca, Calif. Two major storms destroyed and buried eight miles of this road, which is heavily used by area residents and tourists. Granite Construction had to remove large amounts of dirt from the road, grade it, recompact the base and then pave it. The company worked with the County of Riverside to complete the project ahead of schedule, maximizing its production in order to maintain the public's access to essential services.

    · Work on reconstruction and widening of a section of Madison Street in Indio. The company worked closely with 14 stakeholders and diverted almost all of its resources in the area to ensure that the project was completed in time for the region's Coachella Music Festivals. Using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and crushed recycled aggregate base to conserve natural resources

    Granite Construction Co. of Santa Barbara, Calif.

    · Work on emergency repair to Highway 101 in Santa Barbara County. The work was part of an emergency contract awarded after the deadly mudslide in Montecito. Partnering with Caltrans, Granite Construction did a grind and overlay of the northbound and southbound lanes in that area. The company incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes, conserving natural resources and reducing greenhouse gases.

    · Work on Highway 126 in Ventura County. This urban 110,000-ton mill-and-overlay project was completed in two lifts using 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement. The base course was a 3-inch layer, followed by a 1.8-inch surface layer. One portion of the roadway required an open grade friction course totaling 6,000 tons. A tapered notch wedge was put on the screed to complete the joints.

    · Mill and overlay of four different roads in Palmdale, Calif. When the oil originally specified for the project's asphalt mixes was unavailable, the company suggested an alternative that exceeded the previous mix design. It also developed a new method of sealing cracks that created a better surface for compaction, resulting in a smoother roadway. Using 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) to conserve natural resources, Granite Construction produced a high-quality asphalt pavement with excellent rideability and aesthetics.

    Granite Construction Co. of Santa Clara, Calif.

    · Work on the overlay of Blanco Road in Monterey County. The existing road was in rough condition, so Granite Construction Co. worked with the project owner and the grinding subcontractor to do micro-milling on the road. This enabled the company to place the overlay more quickly.

    Granite Construction Co. of Ukiah, Calif.

    · Work on the overlay and micro-surfacing of Highway 253 in Mendocino County. The company planed the pavement and then laid a .25-inch asphalt layer in each direction along the 17.2-mile road, which had many slopes and curves. Granite Construction Co. used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes and returned all the material ground from the original pavement to its plant for production of future RAP. This approach conserves natural resources and reduces greenhouse gas production.

    Sully-Miller Contracting Co. of Brea, Calif.

    · Work on Hollywood Burbank Airport Taxiway C and D rehabilitation in this urban California city. A 12.5mm fuel-resistant asphalt mix – debuting for the first time on the West Coast - was one of four mixes used on the project. It was laid at a thickness of 1 inch, which was a challenge in terms of density control, asphalt placement and meeting the project's specifications.

    · Work on Ontario International Airport South Cargo Ramp. A P-401 surface overlay was performed on the ramp, which acts as staging area for film shoots and horse transportation. Crews coordinated with this urban California airport to give access to film crews as well those awaiting the return of the 2018 Triple Crown winner, Justify. The project was opened in stages and fully completed Dec. 19, 2018, allowing for higher airport cargo volume in anticipation of the approaching holidays.

    · Work on Ontario International Airport Terminal 1 Gates 1-3 Apron and and Taxilane G rehabilitation project in this urban California city. The P-401 surface layer required a unique PG 82-22PM binder, which was produced and shipped at a 400-mile distance from the hot-mix asphalt facility. Sully-Miller also had to work with international customs to ensure construction did not interfere with flights located adjacent to the work area.

    · Work on Route 395 in San Bernardino County. The existing pavement was in very poor condition prior to the start of this urban widening and mill-and-overlay project. The California Department of Transportation allowed Sully-Miller to perform pre-paving corrections to help meet strict smoothness requirements.

    COLORADO

    Four Corners Materials, A CRH Co., of Durango, Colo.

    · Work on Durango-La Plata County Airport Taxiway A in urban Durango, Colo. The taxiway was graded and then paved with 10 inches of new asphalt completed in four lifts. Due to time restraints, the project was divided into two phases with no breaks between phases once paving began. Phase One consisted of 10 consecutive paving days and Phase Two was completed in five days.

    · Work on US 491 in Cortez, Colo. This I-491 project in rural Montezuma County included two layers of a fresh overlay and road widening. The first leveling course was a 1-inch 9.5 mm Superpave mix followed by 1.5-inch stone matrix asphalt (SMA) mix. This was only the second SMA project for the Colorado Department of Transportation, Region 5, and the first for Four Corners Materials.

    Martin Marietta, A CRH Co., of Colorado springs, Colo.

    · Resurfacing of about 12 miles of I-25 in Pueblo County. In addition to milling and overlaying the road, the company performed bridge repair work, extensive guardrail realignment and a micro surface treatment. Martin Marietta used 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the product mixes.

    · Mill and overlay of 3.2 miles of SR 1 in Cleburne County. A good portion of the road goes over Cheaha Mountain and has steep grades and curves. To improve traction, the company placed an open grade friction course on this section.

    Martin Marietta of Fort Collins, Colo.

    · Work on reconstruction of CR 70 in Larimer County. The company ground and mixed the old asphalt mat, base and substructure down to a depth of 10 inches, mixed in fly ash to stabilize it, and then placed three courses of asphalt pavement. It used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, conserving natural resources while reducing energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on overlay of various roads in Fort Collins, Colo. The company milled and filled the roads, working with local residents to minimize the impact of the work on street parking. It incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the asphalt mixes for the project, conserving natural resources and reducing energy consumption and the production of greenhouse gases.

    Martin Marietta of Greeley, Colo.

    · Work on various roads in Greeley, Colo. The company milled and filled some roads and just milled others before placing an asphalt overlay on all of them. Martin Marietta used 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, a green approach that conserved virgin materials and reduced energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    United Cos., A CRH Co., of Grand Junction, Colo.

    · Mill and overlay of I-70 between Avon and Vail, Colo. The company performed all work at night due to the high traffic volumes in the area.

    · Work on Yampa Valley Regional Airport in rural Hayden, Colo. This was new construction that included the parking lot, apron and access road leading to the airport. A 3-inch PG 58-28 base course was laid first, followed by a 2-inch PG 64-28 surface layer. More than 12,600 tons of asphalt was used during construction.

    DELAWARE

    Allan Myers of Dover, Del.

    · Work on rubblizing and overlay of US 113 in Georgetown, Del. To mitigate the cracking and deterioration of the underlying pavement, the company milled each section of the road and replaced the material on it in the same night. After applying a spray coat of ultra-thin pavement, the company placed an overlay of rubberized stone matrix asphalt. Allan Myers used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt tires in the project mixes, conserving natural resources, reducing energy consumption and limiting greenhouse gas production.

    FLORIDA

    Ajax Paving Industries of Florida of North Venice, Fla.

    · Work on the Costco Parking Lot in Bradenton, Fla. The company successfully paved the parking lot, meeting the very tight job specifications.

    · Work on CR 763 in DeSoto County. The company's scope of work included milling, pavement resurfacing and drainage improvements to the road. The company was able to detour traffic away from the road while installing the culverts.

    · Work on I-75 in Bradenton, Fla. This urban project began where I-75 crosses over SR 64 and extended outward about a mile in each direction. A binder 3-5-inch course was followed by a ¾-inch open-grade friction course.

    · Work on I-75 in Punta Gorda, Fla. This was an extensive urban project to add a 12-foot travel lane and paved shoulder in each direction, while also correcting the existing mainline cross slopes without jeopardizing the existing base. Work included milling and resurfacing at various depths, as well as some constant depth milling and overbuilding. Ajax Paving coordinated with Punta Gorda Airport, as Runway 22 aligns with the N. Jones Loop interchange.

    · Work on Peter O. Knight Airport Runway 4-22 in Tampa, Fla. This urban mill-and-overlay project was a highly coordinated effort that faced many challenges, such as obtaining security clearances for crew members, maintaining airport traffic during construction, and following strict dust and debris guidelines. The project was completed on time and within the allocated grant budget. A 4-inch P-403 asphalt mix was used.

    · Mill and overlay of 6.6 miles of SR 29 in Hendry County. The company milled and placed an asphalt overlay on the road.

    · Work on SR 60 in Hillsborough County. The company milled the road and placed a two-ich overlay on the road, which is one of the most congested in the city.

    · Work on almost 12 miles of SR 64 in Hardee County. The company reconstructed some areas of the road, then milled the existing asphalt and base on all parts before placing an asphalt overlay. The company also made changes to the project that saved the state money.

    · Work on 5.94 miles of SR 758 in Sarasota County. The project scope included work on the road's base, milling and resurfacing, extension of turn lanes, ADA improvements and installation of curb and gutter, sidewalks, guardrails and signals. The company worked at night on this busy road to maximize production while minimizing disruptions to motorists.

    · Work on SR 82 in Fort Myers, Fla. This urban reconstruction project involved the first Continuous Flow Intersection (CFC) in Florida, featuring a unique left turn crossover movement. Motorists encounter three sets of interconnected signals, one at each crossover point in addition to the main intersection. Just east of this CFC intersection is a wetland area, where crews found 6.5 feet of asphalt previous contractors had placed to help eliminate settlement.

    Anderson Columbia Co. Inc., of Lake City, Fla.

    · Work on SR 15 in Hilliard, Fla. This project involved milling depths ranging from 1.5 to 4 inches and then placing two lifts of a 12.5 mm Level D course containing 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement. This was followed by a ¾-inch open-graded friction course.

    · Work on SR 55 in Cross City, Fla. This rural mill-and-overlay project consisted of cross slope corrections on super elevated curves, 2-inch milling and then paving 14.7 miles of a four-lane divided highway. The paving consisted of a 2-inch layer of a 12.5 mm structural course containing 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement and a ¾-inch virgin open-graded friction course.

    CWR Contracting Inc. of Freeport, Fla.

    · Mill and overlay of 4.73 miles of CR 30A in Santa Rosa Beach, Fla. Because the road had extreme longitudinal and transverse cracking, the company milled it down to remove the existing mat. It then applied a tack coat and overlaid the entire road with a 1.5-inch course of asphalt surface mix.

    Duval Asphalt Products Inc. A CRH Co., of Jacksonville, Fla.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 200 at its intersection with U.S. 1 in Nassau County. The heavy tractor trailer loads and log trucks that regularly use the road made traffic control challenging. The company did the milling and structural work during the day but laid the final course of the asphalt pavement at night to achieve the best results and limit traffic delays.

    · Work on SR 5A in St. Johns County. Duval used a special asphalt mix to ensure the road could withstand the rutting caused by carriage horses traveling along the bayfront in St. Augustine. It also used 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes to reduce the use of virgin aggregates and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Working around heavy business and tourist traffic.

    General Asphalt Co. Inc. A CRH Co., of Miami, Fla.

    · Work on I-95 in Pompano Beach and Deerfield Beach, Fla. This large urban construction project added four lanes to the heavily-traveled I-95. The project began in November 2016 and was completed in August 2019. Multiple lane closures were only permitted for a few hours, with a stipulation that the roadway open by morning. The Florida Department of Transportation was pleased with the final pavement, which used more than 111,000 tons of asphalt.

    · Work on Key West International Airport Runway 9-27. The extension and rehabilitation of Runway 9-27 in urban Key West, Fla., specified construction only during the overnight hours between 10 p.m.-7 a.m. The southern climate allowed paving to take place between Jan. 7-Feb. 28, 2018, with 37 shifts during a 43-day calendar span. More than 23,000 tons of P-401 asphalt were placed with no corrections needed.

    · Work on SR 94 in Miami. The company had to adjust 22 manholes and 4 valves before milling could begin. It then did variable depth milling of the road to change its cross slope before placing a 1-inch asphalt overlay. Through careful, precise work, General Asphalt Co. was able to execute the design with a high level of accuracy

    · Work on SR 997 in Miami. This urban project in the Krome Avenue Corridor was the first in a series of 8-10 projects aimed to improve safety, traffic operations and access points in an effort to reduce the number of fatalities on this road. The corridor was widened from two lanes to a four-lane divided highway. Other road improvements included installing drainage systems and lighting. Almost 70,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete the work.

     
    Preferred Materials Inc., A CRH Co., 

    · Work on Cecil Airport Runway 9L-27R in Jacksonville, Fla. The 50-foot center keel section of the runway was milled to a depth of two inches and then resurfaced. The remaining 75-foot sections on either side of the center keel were milled to a depth of 1.5 inches and then resurfaced. In addition, work on aircraft tie-down anchors and pavement reconstruction of these areas was part of this urban project's scope.

    · Work on SR 115 in Duval County. The company did all paving at night in this high-traffic area to minimize disruption to nearby businesses and residences. It also added a new guardrail and handrail to the bridge over the St. John's River. Preferred Materials Inc. incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in all the project mixes, conserving natural resources by limiting the need for virgin aggregates and binders and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on 6.7 miles of SR 25 in Alachua County. The company milled and resurfaced this four-lane divided highway that goes through the Town of High Springs. It laid structural and friction courses on the road, using a special mix for the 65-mph roadway section. Preferred Materials incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes, which conserves natural resources, reduces the need for virgin aggregates and binders, and decreases the production of greenhouse gases.

    · Mill and resurfacing of 7.7 miles of SR 49, a rural, two-lane road in Levy County. The road carries a lot of truck and farming equipment so the company paid special attention to maintaining the safety of its crews and area motorists. Preferred Materials produced a smooth, quality asphalt pavement using 40 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in two mixes and 20 percent reclaimed asphalt in one mix. Incorporating RAP conserves natural resources, reduces the need for virgin aggregates and binders, and decreases the production of greenhouse gases.

    · Work on approximately 1.5 miles of SR 5 in Duval County. The company did the milling and paving at night to minimize disruptions to businesses and residences in this high-traffic area. Preferred Materials Inc. used 40 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in two of the project mixes and 20 percent RAP in another. This approach conserves natural resources by reducing the need for virgin aggregates and binders and by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Preferred Materials Inc.

    Preferred Materials Inc., A CRH Co. of Orlando, Fla.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 408 in Orange County, Fla. Since the project ties into the neighboring I-4 interchange project, the company had to partner with other contractors working in the area to maintain the desired progress schedule. Despite traffic detours and other challenges.

    · Milling and resurfacing of SR 408 in Orlando. Fla. To keep the work on schedule, the company partnered with other companies working on the adjacent I-4 interchange project. Despite detours and other construction activities that impacted its work.

    · Construction of the 2.5-mile track for SunTrax Test Facility in Polk County, Fla. The road included straightaways, elevated curves and toll gantries, providing a controlled environment to test toll systems, express lanes and other emerging vehicle technologies. Despite the challenges of paving through super-elevated curves with up to 10 percent slopes.

    Preferred Materials Inc., A CRH Co. of Tampa, Fla.

    · Work on SR 586 in Dunedin, Fla. The company had to mill the road to variable depths at several points along the project area before placing an asphalt overlay on it. Work also included reconstruction of traffic separators and improvements to drainage, sidewalks and signals.

    · Work on SR 93 in San Antonio, Fla. This urban mill-and-overlay project used more than 131,000 tons of asphalt to add additional lanes to SR 93 and widen the existing bridges at SR 52. The construction also included the addition and configuration of southbound ramps. The overall project created a safer and simpler design, allowing for future expansion in the area.

    · Work on 4 miles of US 41 in Fort Myers, Fla. The project zone included eight intersections along the heavily congested road. The company had to erect and maintain eight pedestrian detours, including temporary bus stops and signage, to construct the shafts for new signals.

    · Work on Veterans Expressway in Hillsborough County. The company milled and resurfaced the road, adding new lanes in both directions in conjunction with the expansion of the overpass crossings and ramps in several intersections. With minimal impact to motorists.

    Ranger Construction Industries of West Palm Beach, Fla.

    · Work on SR 91 in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. This urban mill-and-overlay project was faced with several challenges, including working with 14 different mill depths varying from 1-inch up to 7 3/4 inches. Crews used their seven-hour lane closure work window to stack multiple lifts, while still meeting the International Roughness Index ride requirements for the surface course. Several ramps were closed for entire weekends.

    Ranger Construction Industries Inc. of Winter Garden, Fla.

    · Construction of the I-95 Diamond Interchange in Brevard County. The goal of the project was to reduce congestion on the interstate and provide more efficient access for local motorists. The road also enables connections to other east-west roadways that serve as emergency evacuation routes.

    · The reconstruction, widening, overbuild and other work on SR 614 in St. Lucie County. The company worked under tight time constraints on an expedited schedule, facing challenges such as the demucking of an existing canal in order to build two new lanes for the road. Ranger Construction used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, conserving virgin materials and reducing energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on US 1 in St. Lucie County. The project scope included milling, resurfacing, drainage improvements, curb and gutter, sidewalk and driveways, signalization, pedestrian detectors and traffic monitoring sites.

    · The construction of Western Way in Winter Garden, Fla.

    GEORGIA

    C. W. Matthews Contracting Co. Inc. of Marietta, Ga.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 100 in rural Meriwether County. Prior to the work, the road had a rough ride due to significant pavement distress. C.W. Matthews Contracting patched the road, widened the shoulders and placed a final surface that improved the road's ride by 53 percent The company also conserved natural resources by using 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the surface mix and 25 percent and 30 percent RAP in the shoulder and patching mixes.

    · Mill and overlay of rural SR 283 in Hall County. The road was in a distressed condition because it handles more than 2,700 vehicles a day, with 11 percent truck traffic. C.W. Matthews helped ensure the smoothness of the final pavement by placing an interlayer as a crack mitigation and prevention treatment. It also used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes to conserve natural resources. The company produced a high-quality road with a 68 percent improvement in the riding surface.

    East Coast Asphalt LLC, of Douglas, Ga.

    · Work on almost four miles of SR 4 in Ware County. The company milled and paved the road and rehabilitated the shoulders. It used a sustainable paving approach, incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes to conserve virgin materials and reduce energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions. Using continuous paving operations, East Coast Asphalt produced a high-quality pavement that showed a 69 percent improvement in smoothness.

    Pittman Construction Co. of Conyers, Ga.

    · Work on Jackson County, Georgia. This project included milling, single-surface treatment, inlay, plant mix resurfacing and shoulder rehabilitation. The two-lift job included a ¾-inch 9.5 mm Superpave leveling course and a 1.5-inch 12.5 mm Superpave surface layer. The total project was almost 17 miles in length and used more than 92,000 tons of asphalt.

    Reeves Construction Co. of Macon, Ga.

    · Work on I-75 in Crisp and Turner Counties in Cordele, Ga. This 14.47-mile project consisted of plant mix resurfacing and shoulder rehabilitation. Plant foaming technology was used during production for all mixes, which helped improve the film coating consistency of the aggregate partials. All mixes requiring PG76-22 binder contained 8 percent crumb rubber, keeping 1 million pounds of recycled rubber from entering landfills.

    · Resurfacing of 12.6 miles of US 280 in Crisp and Wilcox Counties. All of the asphalt mixes placed during this project included 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) to reduce the use of virgin aggregates. The company also used plant foaming technology to decrease the energy required for mix production. Reeves elected to employ a material transfer vehicle to place the final surface pavement, producing a smoother, denser road with a 63 percent improvement in ride quality.

    IOWA

    Norris Asphalt Paving Co. of Ottumwa, Iowa

    · Work on CR M68 in Carroll County. The company milled the road and then placed an overlay. One challenge was the long distance traveled by trucks hauling aggregate to the site.

    · Work on 5.2 miles of Highway 2 in Decatur City, Iowa. For the rural section of the road, the company used cold-in-place recycling before placing an overlay; in the urban section, it milled the road, placed an interlayer and then laid an asphalt overlay. Challenges included scheduling, specification requirements for moisture and time after completion, and the limited trucking resources in the area.

    IDAHO

    Idaho Materials & Construction, A CRH Co. of Nampa, Idaho

    · Mill and overlay SH 55 in Smith's Ferry, Idaho. The company had to work under tight time restrictions because the road is a heavily traveled state highway that travelers use to access recreational areas in Idaho's mountain region. Idaho Materials & Construction used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in some asphalt mixes, a green approach that conserves virgin materials and reduces energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions. The company produced a smooth, high-quality asphalt pavement that will serve travelers well.

    Interstate Concrete & ASPHALT, A CRH CO., of Rathdrum, Idaho

    · Work on I-90 in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The reconstruction project on this highly-traveled portion of I-90 in urban Idaho took two years to complete under heavy traffic and less-than-ideal staging procedures. Two lanes of traffic were maintained in each direction during construction with innovative traffic-control procedures in place. Crews worked 24-hour rotating shifts with multiple paving operations running in simultaneous work zones. In all, 190,000 tons of rock base and 120,000 tons of asphalt were used.

    Knife River Corp., Southern Idaho Division of Boise, Idaho

    · Mill and overlay of 2.42 miles of US 95 in Idaho County. Challenges included getting a smooth and dense pavement on a road that had a 7 percent grade and super elevations. As the project progressed, the company suggested a change to the scope of work that maintained the budget while ensuring the longevity of scenic pullouts.

    Poe Asphalt Paving Inc. of PostFalls, Idaho

    · Work on widening of Barker Road in Spokane County. The company had to clear and grub the area, grade the roadway excavation and pave the road with three lifts of hot-mix asphalt. It also made storm drainage improvements and installed signage and sewers. Partnering was essential because of the multiple contractors working on the site.

    · Work on Bigelow Gulch Road in Spokane County. The company had to keep local traffic moving through the area while placing a 6-inch base and two layers of hot-mix asphalt on the road.

    · Work on I-90 in Kootenai County. Working at night to minimize disruption to traffic, the company milled 43.8 lanes miles of the road then placed an inlay. Work included the resurfacing of multiple bridges and interstate on-and-off ramps. Poe Asphalt Paving incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes, conserving virgin materials and reducing energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Illinois

    Gallagher Asphalt Corp. of Thornton, III.

    · Mill and overlay of Route 50 in Kankakee County. It included 25 to 26 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes to promote the reuse of construction materials and the conservation of virgin materials. The company also decided to employ a wide paving construction technique to eliminate construction seams and achieve a more consistent pavement. The project owner was pleased with the resulting smooth, high-quality roadway, and is considering using this technique as a standard operating procedure on further projects.

    · Mill and overlay of Route 83 in Cook County. The company included higher-than-normal percentages of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes. This sustainable approach reduced the amount of virgin materials required for asphalt production and reduced energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Indiana

    Brooks Construction Co. of Fort Wayne, Ind.

    · Work on I-469 in Allen County in Fort Wayne, Ind. More than 18,000 vehicles, many of them semi-trucks, travel this portion of highway daily. The original pavement was a heavily deteriorated Portland Cement Concrete Pavement. The two-year urban reconstruction project consisted of full-depth mainline and shoulder paving on stabilized subgrade. Ramps received full-depth patching and a 1.5-inch mill and overlay.

    · Work on I-469 in Fort Wayne, Ind. Since this stretch of road handles more than 32,000 vehicles per day, including semi-trailers, the company worked at night to minimize traffic delays. With the use of a material transfer vehicle, a vibratory roller and an oscillating roller, and with careful attention to quality control.

    · Reconstruction of SR 101 in Allen County. Although the road carries relatively little traffic, it was in poor condition due to the number of semi-trucks that use it to haul products from a nearby mill. Maintaining that truck traffic and other local traffic was a challenge for the company throughout the project. Using a material transfer vehicle, vibratory rollers and an oscillating roller, and maintaining strict quality control.

    · Work on US 30 in Kosciusko and Whitley Counties in Pierceton, Ind. This heavily-traveled urban highway project included partial depth patching down to the concrete pavement, 1.5-inch milling, and placement of a 2.5-inch intermediate course, and a 1.5-inch surface lift. A material transfer vehicle, one vibratory roller and two oscillating rollers helped achieve four miles of smooth highway.

    E&B Paving Inc. of Chandler, Ind.

    · Work on SR 165 in Posey and Gibson Counties. Heavy truck traffic caused the roadway to deteriorate between the design and paving times, so the company had to do much more patching than originally planned. It then placed a 2-inch overlay instead of a 1.5-inch overlay.

    E&B Paving Inc. of Jeffersonville, Ind.

    · Mill and overlay of US 31 in Clark County. Because this section of the road had been paved in three different sections over the years, the company had to correct the profile and the slope to produce a more consistent pavement. E&B Paving used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) mixes for paving, a green approach that conserves virgin materials and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

    E&B Paving Inc. of Kokomo, Ind.

    · Work on three roads in Logansport, Ind. Project challenges included having separate paving crews on different sites, three different asphalt mixes made in different plants and project scheduling.

    E&B Paving Inc. of Muncie, Ind.

    · Work on SR 26 in Grant and Blackford Counties. The company reconstructed some areas of the project and placed different asphalt overlays on each of the three road sections. Scheduling work and getting supplies and equipment in and out of the area was difficult because of road and bridge closures.

    J.H. Rudolph & Co. Inc., A CRH Co. of Tell City, Ind.

    · Work on SR 545 in Dubois County. The pavement was severely deteriorated and was badly cracked due to heavy agricultural and recreational traffic. The company patched the road base, milled the pavement and placed an asphalt overlay, working through challenges such as heavy traffic and underground springs.

    Milestone Contractors LP of Bloomington, Ind.

    · Work on the Renovation of Indiana University's Athletics' Orange Parking Lot in Bloomington, Ind. This high-profile project was constructed under a very tight time frame between the fall and spring semesters. In addition to reconstruction and new construction of the parking lot, the project included traffic island installation, storm drainage, sidewalks, new lot lighting and several thousand feet of curbing.

    Milestone Contractors LP of Indianapolis, Ind.

    · Work on CR 400 in Bartholomew County. The company deep milled the road and placed a 1-inch intermediate course followed by a 1 ½-inch surface course of asphalt. To boost the road's longevity, it also placed a void-reducing asphalt membrane in the center joint to reduce the water filtration from potholes, joint separation and other issues that degrade asphalt surfaces.

    Milestone Contractors LP of Lafayette, Ind.

    · Work on North Ninth Street and Duncan Road in Lafayette, Ind. The work included cold-in-place recycling and the placement of a stone matrix asphalt surface course. Sequencing was critical since the company was working under a tight schedule with limited time for road closures.

    Walsh & Kelly Inc. of Griffith, Ind.

    · Work on US 31 project in South Bend, Ind. Just over 50,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete a mill-and-overlay job by crews dedicated to the project and interested in producing a quality pavement. The 3-inch binder course used 32,000 tons of asphalt, followed by the 1.5-inch blast furnace slag surface lift that used 13,000 tons. Almost 5,000 tons of asphalt was used to complete shoulder work.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 55 in Newton County. The company milled nine miles of the existing road and then laid a 2 ½-inch intermediate course of asphalt and a 1 ½-inch surface course. Traffic control was very important on this two-lane road.

    Walsh & Kelly Inc. of South Bend, Ind.

    · Work on SR 933 in South Bend, Ind. This urban project involved milling and then replacing the binder and surface layer of five traffic lanes using a new Superpave 5 specification. The target for air voids was 5 percent and the target for density was 95 percent.

    KENTUCKY

    Louisville Paving & Construction Co.A CRH Co. of louisville, Ky.

    · Mill and overlay of I-71 in Henry County. The company lowered the road's grade to add clearance under an overpass by adding aramid fibers to the base course to reduce pavement thickness while maintaining its strength. Intelligent compaction technology helped maintain consistent pavement density and an electronic delivery management system maximized project efficiency.

    · Work on Louisville International Airport West Airfield Shoulder. This urban reconstruction project required significant partnering with subcontractors and the project's owners to complete the project while the remainder of the airport remained functional. Crews worked around the clock to meet the tight schedule and featured a coordinated effort between the various teams – milling, paving, striping, and grading.

    · Mill and overlay of various rural roads in Oldham County. The company carefully controlled traffic during paving activities to keep workers and motorists safe. It also installed a special safety edge on the pavement to help keep drivers from drifting off the roadway. Louisville Paving & Construction Co. used the maximum allowed reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes, conserving natural resources while reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Mountain Enterprises Inc., A CRH Co., of Lexington, Ky.

    · Work on KY 9 in Grayson, Ky. This mill-and-overlay project on heavily-traveled KY 9 features a ¾-inch leveling lift and a 1.25-inch surface layer. A scratch course mix was used as well as a separate shoulder surface mix. The construction also featured new guardrails and ditching work to allow for better water flow.

    · Work on Route 80 in Floyd County. The company rehabilitated the road, milling it and placing an asphalt overlay, and rehabilitated the shoulders, including guardrails, as well.

    · Work on 5 miles of US 119 in Letcher County. The road, which included two-lane, three-lane and four-lane sections, was in very poor condition. Mountain Enterprises repaired the base of the road before paving.

    · Work on 8.8 miles of US 23 in Johnson County. The company milled this heavily traveled highway and then placed an asphalt overlay.

    Scotty's Contracting and Stone LLC of Bowling Green, Ky.

    · Work on I-165 (William H. Natcher Parkway) in Warren County. The project included the rehabilitation, milling and asphalt overlay of the road as well as some work on the median and shoulders and repairs to an existing bridge. With the project's tight schedule, the company had to pay special attention to planning and details.

    · Milling and overlay of 8.3 miles of I-65 in Barren, Edmonson and Warren Counties. Since the road is so heavily traveled, the company had to work at night whenever it needed to close multiple lanes for construction. With careful planning and attention to project details.

    · Work on I-65 in Hardin County, Ky. This was a large-scale interstate widening project that involved adding a lane and shoulder in each direction with a permanent barrier wall in the median. Drainage, bridge and interchange construction were also part of the roadwork that used more than 600,000 tons of asphalt. Traffic was restricted to two lanes during the day and one at night as four paving crews worked around the clock to complete the project within the required tight time constraints.

    · Work on 6.14 miles of Nebo Road in Hopkins County. The company milled the road and placed an overlay on this busy corridor of US 41A. With careful attention to detail and scheduling.

    Louisiana

    Barriere Construction Co. LLC, of Metairie, La.

    · Work on I-55 in McComb, Miss. The project consisted of roadway upgrades to include 7.6 miles of concrete rubblization and asphalt overlay, new cable barrier, median drainage improvements, and 24 new traffic signal installations.

    R.J. Daigle & Sons Contractors Inc., of Gonzales, La.

    · Mill and overlay of LA 22 in Ascension Parish, La. The existing highway was in poor condition, with rutting, crumbling shoulders and potholes in various sections. In some areas the company had to address issues like shoulder rehabilitation; in others, it eliminated the potential for trapping water on the roadway. R.J. Daigle & Sons Contractors used more than 4,200 tons of recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) from the original pavement in the mixes.

    Maryland

    Gray & Son Inc. of Timonium, Md.

    · Work on I-695 in Baltimore County. Because of the heavy traffic volumes in the area, all work had to be done during non-peak hours. The job was further complicated because problems with the previous overlay required the company to do extensive patching after milling. Using a material transfer device to place the new asphalt surface, and with attention to detail during paving.

    · Work on 3.7 miles of I-95 in Baltimore, Md. The project, which reconfigured the interstate from three lanes to four in each direction, included full depth pavement reconstruction, grinding and resurfacing of existing mainline and shoulders, and numerous on and off ramps. Much of the work was done in very narrow spaces and under limited nighttime hours.

    Massachusetts

    P.J. Keating Co., a CRH Co. of Lunenburg, Mass.

    · Work on the 495 Center parking lot in Northborough, Mass. Project challenges included an accelerated schedule and soft subbase due to rainy weather. Despite weather delays, the company did all grading and paving to the asphalt binder course in two shifts and completed the surface course paving in three days.

    · Mill and overlay of 3.2 miles of High Street in Carver, Mass. Challenges included the poor condition of the road in some areas and the need to maintain traffic flow and keep motorists and workers safe during construction. The company first milled the 23-foot-wide road at all intersections, driveways and end joints, then placed a leveling course and a surface course over most of the road. Crews had to do handwork to match the 125 driveways to the new roadway grade.

    · Work on I-290 in Shrewsbury, Mass. The company micro-milled the heavily traveled road before placing a Superpave warm-mix asphalt on the mainline and a Superpave waterproof surface course on the bridge decks. The use of warm-mix asphalt reduces the energy required for asphalt production and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on Lucy Little Road in Dartmouth, Mass. Working closely with the Town of Dartmouth, the company reconstructed the road, scheduling the project to minimize the impact to traffic to and from the University of Massachusetts.

    · Work on Middle Street in Fall River, Mass. The four-phase project included pulverizing, grading and paving in busy intersections, uphill, and around a hospital while maintaining access for emergency vehicles. Working in coordination with other contractors.

    · Work on approximately 1.6 miles of Onset Avenue in Wareham, Mass. The company worked with town representatives and police on traffic control and safety. It was able to mill and pave the road in just two days while maintaining traffic to the nearby beach.

    · Work on Precinct Street in Lakeville, Mass. The company milled the pavement and placed an overlay on this busy road, which connects to several state highways and a commuter rail station. P.J. Keating crews took special care to ensure that the Superpave asphalt mix would reach the proper compaction.

    · Work on 5.5 miles of Route 2 in Middlesex County. The company used pavement preservation techniques, including an ultra-thin bonded overlay on the existing asphalt surface and a polymer fog seal on the shoulder and break down lanes. Before paving, crews crack-filled and micro-milled a seven-foot key-way into the low speed lanes to create a level joint. They also micro-milled and resurfaced multiple ramps.

    · Work on Rumford Avenue in Manfield, Mass. As part of a multi-year paving contract, the company milled and overlaid this busy road, which is located in the heart of the city near a commuter rail station. The company used warm-mix asphalt for the project, a sustainable choice that reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Mill and overlay of various roads in Ashby, Ashburnham, Holden and Franklin, Massachusetts. The emergency funding for these road repairs had to be spent before the end of the fiscal year, so P.J. Keating had just one month to perform the work. (Additional funding was added for the following fiscal year.) Due to its plant capacity, equipment and manpower.

    · Work on eight roads in Spencer, Mass. The project included pavement reclamation, leveling and resurfacing of the roads with an original project schedule of just 75 calendar days.

    Michigan

    Ajax Paving Industries of Troy, Mich.

    · Work on the FCA Chelsea Proving Ground in Chelsea, Mich. The company crushed and graded the existing pavement to incorporate it into the aggregate base for the new pavement, conserving natural resources. It used a ski and slope control and a high-density paver for the leveling course, as well as a 3D grade checker to assure the proper cross slope.

    · Work on Ford Motor Company QMP Parking Lot in Dearborn, Mich. Work included land balancing, underground utility work, installation of electrical and lighting poles, subgrade stabilization, and placing of an aggregate base and two lifts of hot-mix asphalt. The project required stabilization not included in the original contract; to accommodate the additional work.

    · Work on 2.5-mile Concours Club Race Track in Opa Locka, Fla. The track included 15 curves and turns ranging from 20 degrees to 180 degrees, plus 11 runoff areas.

    Cadillac Asphalt LLC, A CRH Co. of Belleville, Mich.

    · Work on the Ann Arbor Trail in Livonia, Mich. The company milled the road and placed an asphalt overlay on it. To get the lane lines in the correct location, the company had to do extensive layouts and intricate paving

    · Mill and overlay of the I-696 service drives in Macomb County. The company worked at night under heavy traffic, and milled and paved the ramps with adjacent lanes to avoid cold joints on the pavement. Maintaining heavy production.

    · Work on Vernier Road in Wayne County. The company milled and overlaid the road, doing wedging along the gutter lanes and moving the crown point to the middle of the road.

    Cadillac Asphalt LLC, A CRH Co. of Clorkston, Mich.

    · Work on Various Roads in Oakland County, Mich. More than 90 miles of roads were included in this urban overlay project, which used a 5E3 asphalt mix containing 29 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement to complete the 2-inch lift. These roads are traveled by thousands of commuters on a daily basis, and the final smooth roadway was well received by the community.

    Cadillac Asphalt LLC, A CRH Co. of Farmington Hills, Mich.

    · Work on Colemen A. Young City Airport Runway in Detroit, Mich. This urban milling-and-paving project was completed in two long shifts to help minimize the duration of the airport's closure. Two 25-foot pavers were used in echelon to achieve only one longitudinal joint, with the project using 12,000 tons of asphalt.

    · Construction of a new test pad at General Motors City Course in Milford, Mich. Working under very tight tolerances for joint flatness and pavement smoothness, the company successfully produced a high-quality asphalt pavement that is serving its customer well.

    Michigan Paving & Materials Co., A CRH Co. of Canton, Mich.

    · Mill and overlay of Romence Road in Kalamazoo County. The company included reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the paving mixes, conserving virgin materials and reducing energy usage and greenhouse gas production.

    Michigan Paving & Materials Co., A CRH Co. of Comstock Park, Mich.

    · Work on M-46 in Montcalm County. The company used an asphalt stabilizer crack relief layer to minimize the reflective cracking of the original concrete structure, then placed an asphalt leveling course and a wearing course. It incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into one of the asphalt mixes, conserving virgin aggregate and reducing energy usage and the production of greenhouse gases.

    · Work on Muskegon County Airport Runway 6-24 in Norton Shores, Mich. Crews of this urban mill-and-overlay project were required to meet a grade elevation specification. Total-station GPS robotics and automation helped achieve this specification while a 1-inch leveling course and a 2- inch surface layer were placed.

    Michigan Paving & Materials Co., A CRH Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich.

    · Mill and overlay of Milham Avenue in Kalamazoo County. The company included reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the paving mixes, conserving virgin materials and reducing energy usage and greenhouse gas production.

    Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Grawn, Mich.

    · Mill and overlay of 11.5 miles of M-72 in Leelanau and Traverse Counties. The company had to control traffic carefully since this is the main artery for tourists traveling from Traverse City to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

    Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Kalamazoo, Mich.

    · Work on US 131 in Kalamazoo County. The company performed all paving work at night and used two pavers in echelon for the 18 ramps to minimize the time that they were closed.

    Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Lansing, Mich.

    · Work on the Chelsea Proving Grounds Highway Lanes in Chelsea, Mich. This facility, which replicates real-life driving situations, includes highway on and off ramps, a traffic circle and roundabout. With detailed planning and layout.

    · Work on the Fowlerville Proving Grounds ADAS Test Facility in Fowlerville, Mich. The facility was built to replicate real-world driving situations, so the project included highway on and off ramps, a roundabout, multiple intersections, a straightway and a 3.75-acre development pad. With careful planning and layout.

    · Resurfacing of the Fowlerville Proving Grounds Road C in Fowlerville, Mich. Before paving the road, the company had to make repairs to the cracks to ensure the smoothness of the asphalt overlay. The company also placed a Glass Grid pavement reinforcement area in certain areas of the development pad to mitigate cracking.

    Rieth-Riley Construction Co. Inc. of Wyoming, Mich.

    · Work on westbound I-196 in Allegan County. This road is critical to the numerous manufacturing facilities and large agricultural operations, which use it to transport their goods to customers in Chicago and Detroit.

    Minnesota

    Valley Paving Inc. of Shakopee, Minn.

    · Work on I-94 in downtown St. Paul, Ramsey County. The company conserved natural resources by incorporating the asphalt milled from the road into the project mixes; using this reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) conserved natural resources. Valley Paving completed all mainline paving in two of the four allowed weekend shutdowns, allowing the concrete, guardrail and striping work to be completed during the other two. The shutdowns reduced the project's impact on commuter traffic and provided a safer work environment for paving crews.

    Mississippi

    Adcamp Inc., A CRH Co. of Jackson, Miss.

    · Work on the Ampitheater Parking Lot in Brandon, Miss. The part of the lot dedicated to the Amphitheater required heavy-duty paving capable of handling trucks; the section used by the youth recreational leagues needed medium-duty paving. Despite having to move its equipment in and out to allow for other construction activity in the area, Adcamp was able to complete portions of the job in time for certain Amphitheater events. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in all of its mixes to reduce the amount of virgin aggregates required for paving.

    APAC-Mississippi Inc., A CRH Co. of Columbus, Miss.

    · Work on I-385 in Memphis and Collierville, Tenn. The road, which connects the rapidly growing City of Collierville to East Memphis, carries heavy traffic in some areas. APAC-Mississippi/Tennessee milled the road and placed an asphalt overlay.

    · Work on I-55 in Memphis, Tenn. Using its own crews, the company milled the road and placed an asphalt overlay. The project was challenging because of the very heavy traffic.

    · Work on 9 miles on US 45 in Monroe County. The road, which had last been paved almost 20 years ago, needed a complicated blend of different repair and maintenance design applications at varying depths. The company's work included patching, scrub seal, cold-milling and overlay on a route that included eight intersections, 200-plus driveways, eight guardrail sections and 2 crossovers. Through careful planning and traffic control.

    · Work on 13 miles of Highway 25 in Tishomingo County. The company dug out and patched the road throughout the length of the project before it milled the pavement and placed an asphalt overlay. Challenges included 86 intersections and 26 driveway pads.

    · Work on 4 miles of US 45 in Columbus, Miss. This section of the road, which had not been paved for almost 20 years, was in rough condition. The company placed an asphalt overlay, producing a smooth pavement that showed a ride quality improvement of more than 70 percent.

    Missouri

    Delta Companies Inc. of Springfield, Mo.

    · Work on I-44 mill and overlay in urban Jasper and Newton Counties in Joplin, Mo. The project started one month behind schedule due to the large amount of rain in the spring and summer of 2019. Once construction began, the roadway was milled and then filled 1¾ inches with a Superpave mix requiring Intelligent Compaction for the rollers. A paver-mounted thermal profile system measured the surface temperature of the asphalt mat behind the screed.

    Capital Paving & Construction, of Columbia, Mo.

    · Work on Highway 65 in Saline and Pettis Counties in Missouri. This full-depth perpetual pavement project took careful coordination due to two other projects - a bridge re-deck and paving operations - happening simultaneously in an adjacent area. The 10-mile project was completed in sections, with the concrete repairs and the asphalt mill-and-fill work tackled first. A concrete overlay section was completed separately in a single 2.5-inch lift to eliminate the need for edge drop-off and the posting of uneven lane signs.

    Delta Cos., Inc. of Cape Girardeau, Mo.

    · Work on old US 51 in Pulaski-Union County. The company widened the road two feet, milling out the existing five inches of shoulder and then laying two asphalt binder courses and a final asphalt surface course. It also patched approximately 250 areas of the existing roadway.

    · Work on Route D in Dunklin and New Madrid Counties. The company placed a 1-inch overlay on the road, greatly increasing its smoothness. The project mixes included 47 percent recycled materials, which included reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) and steel slag. This sustainable approach conserved natural resources and reduced energy consumption and the production of greenhouse gases.

    N.B. West Contracting Co., of Brentwood, Mo.

    · Work on Highway 141 in Louis County. The company paved the road in two phases, spring and fall, placing a 2-inch lift of asphalt over concrete using a spray paver. It also used a warm-mix additive to minimize the concrete joints coming through the mat.

    · Work on I-44 in Franklin County, Mo. This project was 15 miles in length, with the company using two asphalt plants to complete the 4-inch mill-and-fill job under a tight time frame. Crews used intelligent compaction, infrared scanning technologies, and low-tracking tack to complete the two lifts. The first layer was a 19 mm base using 45 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement and the top layer was a 100 percent 12.5 mm virgin stone-matrix asphalt surface course.

    Pace Construction Co. Inc. of St. Louis, Mo.

    · Work on I-70 in St. Louis City and County, Mo. Challenges included limited night-time work hours, varying lane widths, existing concrete median barriers and tie-ins to three existing bridges. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in some asphalt mixes, conserving natural resources and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Pace Construction Co. milled and paved the roadway, using technology such as infrared-scanning equipment and GPS-based intelligent compaction to produce a high-quality pavement.

    Superior Bowen Asphalt Co. LLC, of Kansas City, Mo.

    · Mill and overlay of I-70 in Jackson County. Since this portion of the interstate sits just outside of the Kansas City Royals' Kaufman Stadium, the company worked at night to reduce traffic problems. It partnered with the Missouri Department of Transportation and adjusted its work to resolve problems with milling depths in two areas. Despite the challenges.

    · Mill and overlay of US 69 and various ramps in Johnson County. The company worked at night and around-the-clock on weekends to minimize traffic disruptions on this major artery into Kansas City. Through careful scheduling and attention to quality and details.

    Nevada

    Granite Construction Co. of Sparks, Nev.

    · Mill and overlay of 2.6 miles of SR 648 in the industrual and commercial areas of Sparks and Reno in Washoe County, Nevada. The company worked 24 hours a day to complete the project in one paving season instead of two, limiting the disruption to businesses and motorists. To save energy, reduce costs, and limit greenhouse emissions, Granite Construction Co. pulverized the existing pavement in place, then reused some of it for the roadbed.

    · Work on Waterloo Lane in Douglas County, Nev. The company constructed the base layer by recycling the existing asphalt and underlying subgrade. It also incorporated 15 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into all of asphalt mixes for the project, conserving virgin aggregates. To save energy and reduce vehicle emissions, the company used the same trucks to bring asphalt mixes to the site and haul excess materials away.

    New Hampshire

    Pike Industries Inc., A CRH Co., of, Belmont, N.H.

    · Work on Burlington International Airport Taxiway G in Burlington, Vt. The scope of this urban reconstruction project involved reconstructing 3,500 feet of existing runway while installing new power and communications systems for FAA navigational aids – all while keeping these systems operational during construction. Crews also needed to blast and excavate a 3,000 cubic yard ledge unexpectedly encountered during the project. Multiple project phases helped reduce the construction's impact on airport operations.

    · Work on 5.1 miles of I-89 in Merrimack County. The company milled the road and then, using a spray paver, placed a thin-lift bonded overlay on the road. The company incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes, conserving natural resources and reducing energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions. Working in a tight time frame, and with minimal impact to travelers.

    · Mill and overlay of 3.7 miles of I-93 in Grafton County. Since the project is in a high-traffic area, the company maximized the amount of asphalt laid each shift to shorten the project schedule and minimize disruption to travelers.

    · Work on Route 117 in Richmond, Vt. This was a two-year project that involved installation of drainage in the first year and milling, reclaiming, emulsion injection, cold-mix base and hot-mix installation the second year. Injecting the emulsion was complicated by rainy weather and the emulsion plant's distance from the project site.

    · Work on Route 16 in Dallas Plantation, Maine. The company used recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) to prepare the road for paving and meet the required cross slopes. The use of RAP conserves virgin materials and reduces energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Shim and overlay of 6.2 miles of Route 2 in Somerset County. The Route 2 corridor is a major hauling route for traffic moving west or east. With this overlay.

    · Work on Route 30 in Windham County. During the first year of this two-year, 8.9-mile project, the company installed underdrain. In the second year, it milled the road, corrected elevation deficiencies, placed cold-mix asphalt as a base course and then laid two layers of asphalt. The use of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) conserved virgin materials and reduced energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on Route 5 in Waterboro and Route 117 in Waterboro, Maine. The company placed a sub-base of 100 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) on the roads and incorporated RAP into other project mixes. This approach conserves virgin materials and reduces energy usage and greenhouse gas production.

    · Work on Stephen A. Bean Municipal Airport in Rangeley, Maine.The paving of this rural airport's runway and access road leading to the airport was completed in 12 working days under tight specifications on joint and mat density. The same P-401 asphalt mix was used on the two lifts, each two inches in depth. The airport was not open during construction, and work was completed in late fall using a remote asphalt plant assigned to the project.

    · Work on roads in Buxton, Gorham and Hollis in in Cumberland and York Counties, Maine. The company milled the roads and then placed an ultra-thin bonding wearing course on some sections and a thicker asphalt mix in the roundabouts. Pike Industries used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, conserving virgin materials and reducing the use of energy and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on Routes 140, 108 and 219 in Franklin and Oxford Counties. The company milled the roads and then placed an asphalt overlay on them.

    New York

    Callanan Industries Inc., A CRH Co. of Albany, N.Y.

    · Work on I-90 in Fultonville, N.Y. This was a two-course mill inlay and overlay project that included two large interchanges. A 400-ton per hour drum plant was moved closer to the project from a quarry 150 miles away to increase efficiency. The move took months of planning but disassembling the plant, moving it and erecting it in the new location was completed in five weeks. Despite many rain delays, the final project rideability tests scored high, with the company receiving 96 percent of the potential quality units available.

    · Work on Schenectady County Airport Runway 4-22 in Scotia, N.Y. The airport is home to the Stratton Air National Guard base and is used to fly the military's LC-130s into Antarctica to participate in National Science Foundation projects. The planes are equipped with skis to take off and land on the snow. The project began in 2018, but rain delays caused most of the paving to be completed in the spring of 2019. The runway was finished in two lifts, a 3-inch base coat and a 2-inch surface layer.

    RCA Asphalt LLC, of Mt. Vernon, N.Y.

    · Mill and overlay of the West 207th Street bus lanes in New York City, N.Y. Since the red paint traditionally used for bus lanes wears off quickly, RCA Asphalt worked with the New York City DOT to find alternatives. The solution was adding an iron oxide to the mix, which dyed the asphalt all the way through.

    North Carolina

    APAC-Atlantic Inc., Thompson-Arthur Division, A CRH Co. of Greensboro, N.C.

    · Work on I-40 in Alamance and Orange Counties in North Carolina. A 7.8-mile, 4-lane wide section of roadway was milled 1.5 inches and paved the same night with a 9.5 mm polymer modified asphalt mix. Once the entire project was milled and filled, a ¾-inch open-graded friction course was placed. All work was completed at night under varying road closures.

    · Work on 5R-23L in Greensboro, N.C. The 4,400-foot linear Runway 5R-23L was closed from May through September 2019 to complete the rehabilitation of the project. Crews milled the runway using robotic grade control, removed an existing taxiway and removed all existing electrical fixtures and cables. Robotic grade control was also used to place more than 9,000 tons of a leveling course and almost 34,000 tons of a P-401 surface coat.

    · Work on 6.3 miles of US 29 in Rockingham County, N.C. The company milled the existing pavement 2 1/8 inches and then placed a 1 ½-inch asphalt overlay. APAC-Atlantic incorporated 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) into the asphalt mixes to reduce the use of virgin materials. Working through some scheduling challenges, APAC-Atlantic produced a high-quality asphalt pavement.

    · Mill and overlay of nine roads in rural Stokes County. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes, conserving natural resources and reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In spite of the challenges of working on narrow roadways, and the night work required because of traffic concerns in one downtown area, APAC-Atlantic.

    Blythe Construction Inc., of Charlotte, N.C.

    · Work on I-77 in Mecklenburg County in urban Charlotte, N.C. This nighttime mill-and-overlay project ran through the heart of Charlotte, making traffic control a high priority. Crews used digital speed limit signs, presence lighting, and sequential flashing warning lights with police present. The existing pavement was milled 1.5 inches and then paved with a 2-inch surface lift the same night. The project included work on north- and south-bound lanes, 21 ramps and bridge repairs.

    · Mill and overlay of I-85 in Guilford County. Project challenges included the work area itself, which handles heavy traffic in the area where I-85 and Business 85 merge. Blythe Construction used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in one asphalt mix and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in another mix. This reduced the use of virgin materials, conserved natural resources and reduced the production of greenhouse gases.

    S.T. Wooten Corp. of Wilson, N.C.

    · Milling, paving and shoulder reconstruction of 4.43 miles of I-795 in Wilson County. Working under traffic, the company built a road that can stand up to the demands of truck traffic while keeping motorists safe during heavy rainfalls. S.T. Wooten Corp. used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the project mixes. This green approach conserved virgin materials and reduced energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Ohio

    Barrett Paving Materials Inc. of Franklin, Ohio

    · Reconstruction of 1.1 miles of Cincinnati Dayton Road in Butler County. The project was in a historic area of West Chester, Ohio, so area residents and businesses had a strong interest in the construction schedule, the impact of the project and the end result. Barrett Paving Materials overcame the challenges, minimizing disruptions in the area.

    · Work on the Columbia Parkway in Hamilton County. Working under tight time restrictions and heavy traffic, the company milled and overlaid the road. It also built some widening boxes to pave roadway sections that had a gutter than ran along a wall.

    · Work on 2.7 miles of I-275 in Clermont County. Working at night, the company milled each section of the road, placed a surface course and marked the pavement before reopening it to traffic in the morning.

    · I-71 in Lebanon, Ohio. The urban project featured a 3.25-inch mill-and-fill overlay of two sections of roadway, including ramps at four interchanges and resurfacing 17.62 centerline miles. More than 170,000 tons of asphalt was used, with 75,000 tons completed before the Nov. 1, 2018 interim completion date. Millings were stockpiled for the winter and then incorporated into the asphalt mix, which was laid during the 2019 paving season.

    · Work on North Fairfield Road in Beavercreek, Ohio. The company milled the road to its concrete base, applied a stress absorbing membrane interlayer and then paved the road and striped it. Its crews worked at night to ensure that all lane closures were removed for morning traffic.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 131 in Clermont County. Traffic control was a major concern in this highly congested area, which includes traffic from numerous residential communities and schools. The Ohio DOT required nighttime paving in one area and daytime paving in another, so the company had to scope the work as two separate projects. Despite the challenges.

    Gerken Paving Inc. of Napoleon, Ohio

    · Mill and overlay of M-50 in Lenawee County. The company performed milling and paving operations concurrently in order to re-open each section of the roadway as quickly as possible. It worked during both daytime and nighttime shifts.

    · Work on US 20A in Fulton County. The company milled the road 4 inches and then placed a 2.5-inch asphalt course followed by a 1.5-inch asphalt surface course. Despite the need to work around heavy truck traffic traveling to an adjacent steel facility.

    · Work on Weston Road in Lenawee County. The company corrected inconsistent cross slopes in the road using variable depth wedging, then laid a single 1.5-inch course of Superpave asphalt on 10.1 miles of the road.

    · Work on SR 269 and SR 113 in Bellevue, Ohio. The project included pavement repairs, planning and asphalt overlay. The company planned the work carefully to maintain traffic at the epicenter of the project, which was located at a busy intersection in downtown Bellevue. Gerken Paving used echelon paving to minimize disruption to area businesses.

    · Resurfacing of Weckerly Road in Lucas County. The company milled the mainline pavement and shoulders and then installed intermediate and surface courses of hot-mix asphalt. It paved the mainline and shoulders in the same pass, paying special attention to matching up with existing grades. Working in conditions that included high volumes of vehicle and pedestrian traffic.

    John R. Jurgensen of Cincinnati, Ohio

    · Mill and overlay of I-71 in Hamilton County. Working at night, the company did full depth pavement repair, planed the road with a mill with averaging skis and then laid intermediate and surface courses of asphalt using a material transfer device to achieve better results. John R. Jurgensen incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes and produced the asphalt using warm-mix technology. This green approach conserved natural resources and reduced energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on I-71 in Warren County, Ohio. This 73,000-ton reconstruction project included widening I-71 for the entrance and exit ramps, overlaying the existing lanes of I-71, widening the existing Western Row Bridge and reconstructing Western Row Road. All asphalt mixes used reclaimed asphalt pavement, which was milled from the project and delivered to the plant for recycling. A material transfer device was used for placement, and non-tracking tack helped achieve better rideability and compaction.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 741/SR 725 in Montgomery County. Working at night, the company made pavement repairs and milled the road to produce a good foundation for the new asphalt layers. It incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes and used warm-mix asphalt technology; this green approach conserved natural resources and reduced energy usage and greenhouse gas production.

    · Work on SR 823 in Portsmouth, Ohio. This long-term project took 44 months to complete and added 16 miles of a new, 4-lane roadway, 20 bridges and four interchanges. A material transfer device was used to help place the leveling and surface courses. Paving electronics and skis were used on each lift, with the elevation of each lift confirmed by a survey crew. The surface course was laid in 24-foot wide passes, eliminating the center line longitudinal joint.

    · Work on US 40 in Montgomery County. The company did pavement repair and then used a mill with averaging skis to create a consistent surface for the 1 ½-inch asphalt overlay. John R. Jurgensen included reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes and used warm-mix technology to produce the asphalt. This approach conserved natural resources while reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Kokosing Construction Co. Inc. of Elyria, Ohio

    · Work on Sandusky County Regional Airport Runway 6-24 in Clyde, Ohio. This rural project consisted of 5,500 linear feet of runway rehabilitation, including milling, crack repair, a leveling course to help with profile correction and a 2-inch surface course. The work was completed within 16 calendar days. The FAA P-401 asphalt specification required numerous quality inspections for asphalt content, gradation, moisture content, temperature, and in-place density. The asphalt test results and final ride numbers received high scores.

    Kokosing Construction Co. Inc. of Mansfield, Ohio

    · Resurfacing of three roads in Wyandot County. The company had to reschedule its work, paving in three mobilizations to accommodate the needs of a contractor working on a bridge in the middle of the project. Despite the challenges, Kokosing produced a smooth, dense, high-quality asphalt pavement that won compliments from area residents, business owners and representatives of the Ohio DOT.

    Kokosing Construction Co. Inc. of Westerville, Ohio

    · Work on Dollar Tree Distribution Center Parking Lot in rural Marengo, Ohio. This new construction project encompassed two truck parking lot areas, a parking lot for associates, and the access roads leading to the distribution center. The asphalt binder course for the truck lots was to be completed in 2018, but poor weather and a late season start prevented completion. Kokosing developed a plan to finish the asphalt binder course by mid-May 2019, causing no disruption to other subcontractors or the distribution center's delivery trucks.

    · Work on I-270 in Franklin County. The company had to plan traffic closures and mobilization carefully in order to mill the road and resurface it during short nightly closures. Kokosing Construction Co. incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes, a sustainable paving approach that reduces the use of virgin aggregates and cuts greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on Licking County Regional Airport Taxiway in Heath, Ohio. This urban project involved fully removing the existing taxiway and constructing a new one to meet FAA regulations. Paving with 25-foot wide passes helped reduce the number of cold longitudinal joints, which were trimmed six inches for proper joint compaction. The surface course was paved in one phase to help achieve the best results and to make the taxiway operational as soon as possible.

    · Work on Various Roads in Columbus, Ohio. This urban project involved milling and overlaying 88 different city streets, sometimes moving from one street to the next on a daily or weekly basis. Careful planning was needed as the milling crew could not immediately follow the curb and sidewalk operations – or be too far ahead of the paving crew - as all milled areas had to be resurfaced within seven days. Another coordinating challenge was installing a stress absorbing membrane interlayer on some streets prior to the start of paving operations.

    The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Findlay, Ohio

    · Work on SMARTCenter in East Liberty, Ohio. This was a new Automated and Connected Vehicle Testing facility that needed a closed course environment for controlled and repeatable testing of a wide range of vehicles, including passenger cars and commercial trucks. Echelon paving with up to 36-feet wide passes and the use of a material transfer device helped reduce the number of cold joints.

    · Reconstruction of SR 103 in Mt. Cory and McComb, Ohio. The company partnered with the owner on the project.

    · Work on US 23 in Wyandot County. The company made concrete repairs to the road, milled it and then paved it with a 1.5-inch asphalt pavement.

    The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Thornville, Ohio

    · Work on the AEP Hanging Rock parking lot in Lawrence County. The company had to work around other contractors while placing two lifts of asphalt on the parking lot, one base and one surface.

    · Work on CR 11 in Perry County. The challenges of paving this road included traffic, steep hills and very low shoulders. The Shelly Co. placed two lifts of asphalt on the road.

    · Work on Lawrence County Airpark in South Point, Ohio. A 2-inch P-403 leveling course and a 2-inch P-403 surface lift were placed during this rural reconstruction project, which closed the airpark for 45 days. The project also included the addition of 6,000 feet of edge drains and coordinating a work schedule with an electric subcontractor installing lights.

    · Work on Raiders Road in Muskingum County. The company milled the road and then placed a 2 ¼-inch overlay. Traffic control was challenging because this is a heavily traveled road with many businesses located along it.

    · Work on Section Line Road in Delaware County. Working around the heavy truck traffic traveling to the nearby stone quarry.

    · Work on SR 146 in Muskingum County. The company milled the road and then placed an asphalt overlay. The flaggers on the project faced constant challenges because of the consistent, heavy traffic on the road. Nevertheless.

    · Work on SR 188 in Fairfield County. The company milled the road and then placed two courses of asphalt on it. The milling varied in depth from 3 inches to 10 inches throughout the project; in one case, the company had to remove all the asphalt pavement down to an old brick pavement. It also placed new curb and gutter.

    · Work on SR 218 and 553 in Gallia County. The project zones included steep hills and sharp curves that made paving challenging. Nevertheless.

    · Work on SR 23 in Scioto County. The company milled 7 inches of the existing 4-lane roadway in the Village of Lucasville. It had to maintain at least one lane of traffic in each direction and access to all businesses along the route. Working around several events in the area.

    · Work on almost 3.5 miles of SR 335 in Pike and Scioto Counties. The company milled three separate sections of the road and placed asphalt overlays of varying depths. It also paved parking lots in three state parks in the area.

    · Work on SR 40 in Licking County. The company milled the road, placed a 1-inch asphalt overlay, and replaced the existing curb and sidewalk in Brownsville as part of the project. Despite some challenges with drainage in this area,

    · Work on SR 41 and SR 124 in Highland County. This is a rural, two-lane route with curvy and hilly terrain. The company had to place multiple patches on the road due to extensive cracking and rutting of the existing pavement. The company laid a ¾-inch overlay for 8.1 miles, and in the village of Sinking Springs it milled the road before placing a 1 ¼-inch asphalt surface course.

    · Work on 8.65 miles of SR 52 in Scioto County. The rural two-lane road has a hilly terrain and was heavily cracked and rutted. The Shelly Co. placed a ¾-inch asphalt overlay.

    · Resurfacing of 2.5 miles of Tarlton Road in Pickaway County. The company had to contend with many curves and hills along the project route as well as heavy traffic at times.

    · Work on multiple roads in Gallia County. The company placed an overlay on the roads.

    The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Twinsburg, Ohio

    · Work on Cleveland Burke Airport Runway 6R-24L in Cleveland, Ohio. The multi-phase mill-and-overlay of this urban two-runway airport began in 2018 and was completed in October 2019. The airport, situated on the shores of Lake Erie, serves as a reliever to Cleveland's main airport and receives a great deal of snow and ice during the winter months. The runway was grooved end-to-end to help with traction and skid resistance. A 2.5-inch binder course was placed prior to a 1.5-inch surface layer.

    · Mill and overlay Lakewood Heights Boulevard in Lakewood, Ohio. The company had to contend with the high volumes of traffic getting off or going to Interstate 90. To keep traffic off the milled lanes and keep motorists safe, the Shelly Co. placed an intermediate asphalt course on the areas it had milled each day.

    · Mill and overlay of US 20 through Rocky River in Cuyahoga County. Job challenges included heavy vehicle and pedestrian traffic as well as the requirement to remove and replace existing catch basins, curb, sidewalk and ADA ramps. The company implemented same day mill and fill operations to mitigate road hazards and keep traffic off milled surfaces.

    The Shelly Co., A CRH Co. of Twinsburg, Ohio

    · Overlay of 8.34 miles of I-77 in Tuscarawas County. The scope of work included full-depth and partial-depth pavement repairs, and removal of an existing wearing course under existing structures to maintain proper clearances. Working during limited hours because of summer tourist traffic.

    · Work on 5.53 miles of SR 241 in Holmes County. The project runs through an Amish community that has large community auction centers for livestock, equipment and produce. To avoid disrupting traffic to these events, the company did not work on Wednesdays and many Saturdays throughout the summer. Controlling traffic during work hours was further complicated by the hilly, two-lane landscape and pedestrian and horse traffic.

    · Mill and overlay of IR 90 and SR 271 in Split Lake County. Challenges included a limited paving window at night, heavy traffic on this major artery and a strict joint density specification. The Shelly Co. ran 40 trucks during both milling and paving operations to keep the project moving.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 2 in Lake County. The company used 40 haul trucks, two milling machines and two paving crews working in unison to meet the tight project schedule. Despite the heavy traffic on the road.

    · Work on Ohio Turnpike in Elyrai, Ohio. This large highway project began in April 2018 and was completed in October 2019. Two lanes of traffic were maintained in both directions during construction, which included removing the existing pavement to a depth of 20.5 inches. The subgrade was chemically stabilized and underdrains were installed. More than 178,000 tons of asphalt was used on the project, which met or exceeded all Ohio Turnpike Commission specifications.

    · Work on Ohio Turnpike in Portage and Trumbull Counties. This mill-and-overlay project of the high-speed lane and inside shoulder was completed in a short time frame while still meeting the standard of quality required by the state. The mainline pavement cross section was a 3.5-inch mill and two-course overlay of this heavily-traveled road. Paving was coordinated so there were no overnight joints in the mainline pavement. The shoulder was a 2-inch mill-and-fill, and the project's overall pavement achieved an International Roughness Index of 28.

    · Work on SR 62 in Mahoning County. After making many full-depth pavement repairs, the company milled the road each day and placed a two-course overlay on most portions. It did full width milling and placed the intermediate course before the end of each day's work to avoid pavement drop off.

    Shelly & Sands Inc. of Zanesville, Ohio

    · Construction of CR 29/Common Mall Crossing in St. Clairsville, Ohio. The company milled the road to variable depths, made full-depth repairs to the existing pavement and placed three lifts of asphalt to build the new pavement. This multi-year project, which includes a new bridge, crosses over Intestate 70. Working in several phases.

    · Mill and overlay of 2.5 miles of I-77 in Guernsey County. After milling, the company applied a reinforced mesh to existing pavement joints before placing two courses of asphalt. It used a material transfer device and a mounted thermal scanner to ensure the best pavement results. Shelly & Sands incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes, conserving natural resources and reducing energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work of .93 miles of I-77 in Stark County and 4.07 miles of I-77 in Summit County. The company resurfaced the road with an asphalt overlay and did miscellaneous structure work.

    · Work on 3.85 miles of I-80 in Trumbull County. Working during limited periods at night, the company resurfaced the pavement during an extremely rainy season. Despite these challenges.

    · Work on 5.17 miles of Route 149 in Belmont County. The company milled the road, applied a tack course and then placed a surface asphalt mix. The project also involved adjustment to grades, installation of ADA curb ramps and work around valve boxes, manholes and catch basins.

    · Work on SR 331 and SR 149 in Belmont and Harrison Counties. The project included milling the existing asphalt pavement, partial deck repairs and placement of a tack coat applied with two lifts of asphalt. Other work included adjusting valve boxes, manholes, catch boxes and ADA ramps to grade.

    · Work on 11.4 miles of SR 56 in Athens County. The company made repairs to the pavement and then placed a 1-inch intermediate course and a 1.25-inch surface course of asphalt. A 1.73-mile section of the road required milling and placement of a 1.5-inch surface course. Construction crews also added a catch basin, reconstructed a ditch line and reprofiled one section of road to eliminate flooding.

    · Mill and overlay of 12.5 miles of SR 60 in Morgan County. The company constructed a new roundabout along the route and also paved at night through the town of McConnelsville to minimize disruption to traffic in the area. It incorporated 20 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the project mixes, conserving virgin materials and reducing the use of energy and greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on SR 800 in Barnsville, Ohio. This rural mill-and-overlay project involved milling 2.25 inches of the existing asphalt pavement while also performing full-depth repairs and applying non-tracking tack. The final step was a 1-inch intermediate course and a 1.25 surface lift. Other project improvements involved installing Americans with Disabilities Act curb ramps and placing compacted aggregate on the shoulder.

    · Work on almost 8 miles of US 35 in Jackson County. The company made partial depth repairs then placed a 1-inch overlay on the pavement. For the seven bridge decks in the project area, the company first milled the road and then placed an overlay.

    · Work on various roads in Guernsey County, Ohio. The company made pavement repairs and then milled and filled the roads before placing a 1 ¼-inch asphalt overlay on all 28.23 miles of the project. Shelly & Sands used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, a sustainable approach that conserves natural resources and reduces energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Oklahoma

    Haskell Lemon Construction Co. of Oklahoma City, Okla.

    · Reconstruction of Highway 9 by Lake Thunderbird in Cleveland County. The company built a new bridge and a new roadway while maintaining traffic at all times.

    · Work on SH 37 in McClain County. The company milled and filled this 5-mile, 5-lane road while keeping traffic moving the entire time.

    · Work on Thomas Drive in Edmond, Okla. The company rebuilt the road in four phases, working in a highly congested area that included other construction projects for a new water tower and two public schools. Despite the challenges.

    Pennsylvania

    Allan Myers of Malvern, Pa.

    · Work on Byberry Road in Montgomery County. The project included the milling, resurfacing and general maintenance of the road.

    · Work on approximately 18 miles of the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Montgomery County. The project included the resurfacing of the eastbound and westbound lanes of the turnpike with stone matrix asphalt, pavement patching, reflective pavement markings and signage.

    Glenn O. Hawbaker Inc.

    · Work on I-79 in Butler County. This 17-mile urban project was large in scale to include milling, bituminous paving, concrete patching, bridge repair, guide rail replacement and installation of 28 miles of fiber optic cable. It was determined just prior to the start of construction that the existing pavement was in much worse shape than anticipated, requiring the road to be milled to a deeper 4.5-inch depth. An additional lift was added to the project and the project shifted from night-only work to a continuous 24-hour operation.

    · Lindy Paving Inc. of New Galilee, Pa.

    · Work on I-76 in Hampton Township, Pa. A third lane was added in both directions to this urban 4.4-mile stretch of the Pennsylvania Turnpike while the existing roadway underwent a full reconstruction. The pavement structure included a 4-inch asphalt treated base course, a 4-inch 25 mm rich bottom base course, a 7.5-inch 25 mm base course, a 3-inch 19 mm binder course and a 2-inch 12.5 mm stone-matrix wearing layer. Two lanes of traffic in each direction were maintained throughout this two-year project, which used more than 296,000 tons of asphalt.

    · Work on SR 279 in Pittsburgh, Pa. This urban roadway project spanned eight miles of interstate, starting less than one mile from downtown Pittsburgh. The scope of the project was huge to include concrete patching and overlay, concrete pavement reconstruction, preservation work on 30 bridges, and two culverts. The project used more than 200,000 tons of asphalt and took 2.5 years to complete, with the southbound side completed in 2017, the northbound side in 2018, and the HOV lanes in 2019.

    Northeast Paving Co., of Pittsburgh, Pa.

    · Work on SR 70 and Old Brick Road in Washington County. It repaired the base of SR 70 before milling it and placing an overlay. On Old Brick Road, the company performed cold in-place recycling, using the millings from SR 70 with emulsions to produce a 100 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement. It also used warm-mix asphalt (WMA) for the project to reduce its environmental impact. Partnering with PennDot.

    South Carolina

    Blythe, of West Columbia, S.C.

    · Work on Highway 178 widening in rural Pelion, S.C. The project aimed to reduce the number of accidents and traffic-related deaths on this 20-mile stretch of road. The existing pavement was milled four inches and replaced with a 2-inch intermediate course and a 2-inch surface course. The highway work was divided into sections to keep operations running smoothly and to allow for no more than a 2-inch drop off overnight. The shoulders were widened four feet on each side and six-inch pavement markings were used in place of the standard four-inch markings. New guardrail and road signage were also added.

    · Work on Highway 301 project in rural Orangeburg, S.C. Many accidents and traffic-related deaths have occurred on this 8-mile stretch of highway. The project included clearing trees and overgrown vegetation to increase visibility, and removing concrete pipe end sections and replacing them with beveled end sections. The shoulders were widened six feet on the median and eight feet on the outside shoulder. Finally, six-inch pavement markings were added in place of the standard four-inch markings. A new 18-foot wide left lane and 20-foot wide right lane are now available for a safer traveling public.

    · Work on I-77 mill and overlay in Columbia, S.C. The first step of this large urban project was to remove the deteriorated open graded friction course and lay 118,700 tons of Surface Course Type A – all performed in a 2-inch mill-and-fill event. The was followed by the placement of a 45,000-ton open graded friction course, which used a warm mix containing Evotherm as an additive to the liquid asphalt binder. The warm mix helped reduce emissions, drying cost, and the mixing cost. This section of highway encompasses 40 miles, nine interchanges, and 29 bridges.

    · Work on North Auxiliary Airfield in North, S.C. This U.S. Air Force airfield is located in a rural portion of South Carolina. The runway needed to be closed for the project, which included milling, asphalt paving, asphalt grooving, runway lighting, runway striping and asphalt extensions. Crews were required to meet proposed cross slope and proposed elevations. All requirements came within tolerance, and strict compaction requirements were met or exceeded for mat, joint and PCC joint density.

    Tennessee

    Blythe of Knoxville, Tenn.

    · Work on Shelby-Cleveland County Regional Airport in Shelby, N.C. This mill-and-overlay project used a 2-inch P-401 12.5mm asphalt mix that required a 40-mile haul from the plant to the airport site. Crews learned after the project began that the airport was located near the upcoming National American Legion Youth Baseball League Championship games. Although not part of the bid deadline, Harrison Construction was able to complete the project ahead of schedule, much to the satisfaction of the community and pilots alike.

    Rogers Group Inc. of Columbia, Tenn.

    · Mill and overlay of 3.46 miles of I-24 in Coffee County. Work included installation of interstate signal loops for traffic counting and an epoxy coating on the Noah Fork bridge. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS), a green approach that conserves natural resources while conserving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Mill and overlay of I-24 in Marion County, including the application of a high friction surface treatment. The project was a successful pilot program in the use of intelligent compaction. Rogers Group incorporated both reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) in the project mixes, an approach that limited the use of virgin materials, saved energy and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. The result was a high-quality asphalt pavement that won a Tennessee DOT award for its smoothness.

    Summers-Taylor Inc. of Elizabethton, Tenn.

    · Work on Greeneville Municipal Airport Runway 5-23 in Greeneville, Tenn. This rural reconstruction project required the airport to close while subgrade problems were fixed and the entire area was milled. This was followed by removal of the existing subdrain and replacing it with a new underdrain system. A 6-inch P-209 base stone course was placed ahead of a 2-inch P-401 FAA binder course. The final layer was a 2-inch P-401 FAA surface course, with a total of almost 28,000 tons of asphalt used during the project.

    · Work on I-26 in Washington County. The company placed an asphalt overlay on 7.3 miles of a deteriorating, four-lane concrete road that included a number of bridges. To avoid cracking, the company employed several innovative systems for applications and paving. It also used an open graded friction course for the surface, which allows water to run through and drain out along the base course. Summers-Taylor successfully worked through this complicated project, producing a smooth pavement that met demanding specifications.

    · Construction of a new truck-climbing lane and the mill and paving of existing traffic lanes on I-81 in Sullivan County. The project included grading, erosion control, storm drainage structures and bridgework. The company used sonic averaging skis and a shuttle buggy to place the asphalt mixes.

    · Work on two roads, SR 126 and 93, in Sullivan County. Project tasks included milling, spot leveling, and paving using a shuttle buggy and sonic averaging skis. Using careful workmanship.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 70 and 11-E in Greene County. Both roadways were in dire need of repair. The company's work included milling, spot leveling and placement of an asphalt surface using a shuttle buggy and sonic averaging skis.

    · Work on 2.42 miles of SR 75 in Washington County. The road was in poor condition and one section carried heavy traffic. The company milled the pavement, then used sonic averaging skis and a shuttle buggy to place an asphalt surface mix. Work also included bridge approaches and concrete curb ramps.

    Texas

    Angel Brothers Enterprises of Baytown, Texas

    · Work on I-10 in Harris County. The company worked at night on the road, which is one of the most heavily traveled highways in Texas. Adding to the challenges, Hurricane Harvey hit as the company was working on the project.

    Bay Ltd., of Corpus Christi, Texas

    · Reconstruction of I-69 in Nueces County. This large project included work on ramps and the widening and overlay of roadway and bridges. This was a multi-phase project that was bid in 2012 and was completed in 2019. Bay Ltd. used more than 3,000 tons of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes for the base and intermediate courses, an approach that conserved natural resources, reduced energy consumption and limited greenhouse gas production.

    Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority of Austin, Texas

    · Work on 45 Southwest Toll in Austin, Texas. Almost 100,000 tons of asphalt was used in this 3.6-mile construction project to create a new four-lane toll road. Most of this urban project sits in the Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone, a drinking water resource for the surrounding communities, and home to many rare and endangered species. Extensive coordination and new environmental initiatives.

    Drewery Construction of Nacogdoches, Texas

    · Work on US 69 in Smith County. The company leveled the road as needed and then placed an asphalt surface mix on it.

    Hunter Industries Ltd. of San Marcus, Texas

    · Work on SH 71 in Bastrop County. The project included the construction of an overpass using three courses of asphalt mix. The company used reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the road's base and leveling courses, a green approach that conserves virgin materials and reduces energy consumption and greenhouse gas production.

    Jagoe-Public Company of Denton, Texas

    · Work on I-35 in Denton County, Texas. This urban 85,000-ton overlay project was constructed at night under heavy traffic. Traffic control was coordinated among the crews as they laid a 2-inch stone matrix asphalt mix, PG 76-22.

    Smith & Co. - Vulcan Materials Co., of Conroe, Texas

    · Work on FM 1097 in Montgomery County. Working in several phases, the company placed an asphalt overlay on the road.

    · Work on FM 356 in Polk County. The company widened the road on both sides, reconstructed the lanes and then placed a Superpave asphalt overlay.

    Sunmount Paving, of Justin, Texas

    · Work on 10.8 miles of FM 920 in Wise County. The company placed a 3-inch overlay over the existing road, paying close attention to the paving speed and paver adjustments and keeping the trucks coming regularly.

    Utah

    Granite Construction Co. of Salt Lake City, Utah

    · Mill and overlay of 2.7 miles of SR 173 in Salt Lake County. Since this is a heavily traveled road that includes flex lanes that change direction during rush hour, the company performed much of the work at night.

    Hales Sand & Gravel, A CRH Co. of Redmond, Utah

    · Reconstruction of Ephraim Canyon Road in Ephraim, Utah. The project was a gravel road, so the company first reconditioned it and corrected the elevations. It also installed rip rap and an under-drain system to correct issues from a nearby spring. Hales Sand and Gravel Co. then installed 2 inches of a base course and 4 inches of hot-mix asphalt, using reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes to conserve virgin resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Virginia

    Allan Myers of Glen Allen, Va.

    · Work on I-64 in Bottoms Bridge, Va. The scope of work involved adding a new lane – from base to surface lifts – as well as milling and overlaying the other two lanes with a 2-inch top coat. The project used more than 20,000 tons of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP), reducing the need for virgin materials. The project was completed on time with more than 76,000 tons of asphalt placed.

    · Work on sections of I-64 in Richmond, Va. The company did mainline paving along the eastbound road section and patched and paved various ramps. Allan Myers also milled and placed an asphalt overlay on sections of roadway under overpasses, which had typically been concrete.

    · Construction of the Ford Motor Company QMP Parking Lot in Dearborn, Mich. Work included land balancing, underground utility work, installation of electrical and lighting poles, subgrade stabilization, and placing of an aggregate base and two lifts of hot-mix asphalt. The project required stabilization not included in the original contract; to accommodate the additional work, Ajax Paving Industries' crews worked seven days a week to complete the project and meet the owner's schedule.

    · Mill and overlay of approximately 5.6 miles of I-85 in Petersburg, Va. The company patched and paved the interstate and its exit ramps, and coordinated with subcontractors on the installation of guardrails and rumble strips. The project was unique in its use of an asphalt rubber-graded mixture and of thin hot-mix asphalt. This approach conserved natural resources and reduced greenhouse emissions while preventing future roadway cracking.

    · Mill and overlay of about 3 miles of northbound I-95 in Hampton Roads, Va. To reduce costs and increase productivity on many shifts, the company was able to eliminate the need to repave shoulders. Allan Myers incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into project mixes, reducing the use of virgin aggregates and binders and cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

    · Work on I-95 in Richmond, Va. The company paved multiple sections of the interstate using a thin, hot-mix asphalt overlay.

    Superior Paving Corp. of Gainesville, Va.

    · Construction of Battlefield Parkway in Leesburg, Va. The company had to incorporate existing roads into the new parkway, which required building up some sections and widening and improving others. Traffic control was critical since the route served three schools. The project also included turn lanes, intersections and toll road paving.

    Washington

    Granite Construction Co. of Everett, Wash.

    · Mill and overlay of I-5 in King and Snohomish Counties. The company had to work around heavy traffic, with less than 5-hour lane closures permitted, and coordinating with other contractors working on other sections of the roadway. Despite these challenges, Granite produced a smooth, high-quality pavement. It also used reclaimed asphalt pavement in the mixes to conserve natural resources and reduce the project's environmental impact.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 14 in Clark County. The company's crews worked at night to minimize disruption to the heavy commuter traffic in the area. In compliance with Washington State Department of Transportation's specification, Granite Construction used 41 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the mixes

    Granite Construction Co. of Olympia, Wash.

    · Work on SR 8 in Elma, Wash. The project was spread over 17 miles of roadway, with several skipped sections, making traffic logistics challenging. Since DOT regulations prohibited the use of vibratory rollers on the bridge deck in one section, Granite used an oscillatory roller to produce well-compacted asphalt. The company also incorporated reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) into the mixes, which conserved natural resources and saved money for the owner.

    Granite Construction Co. of Vancouver, Wash.

    · Mill and overlay of SR 500 in Clark County. Much of the paving work on this project was done during weekend closures of the highway to maximize efficiency and reduce disruption to travelers. Using 41 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) to meet the Washington Department of Transportation's specifications.

    Inland Asphalt Co., a CRH Co., of Spokane, Wash.

    · Improvement of 2.32 miles of SR 2 in Spokane, Wash. The company partnered with the Washington DOT and subcontractors to resolve issues like unexpected trolley tracks, a sink hole, and an insufficient asphalt base after milling. Crews worked at night to minimize disruptions to the hundreds of businesses along the job and to a special basketball weekend, Hoopfest, which attracts many visitors. Inland Asphalt Co.

    Lakeside Industries Inc. of Port Angeles, Wash.

    · Work on lake Crescent and East Beach Roads in Port Angeles, Wash. This three-year project completely rehabilitated 18.5 miles of two roads inside Olympic National Park. There were many night closures and some four-hour, mid-day closures – all while accommodating the park's yearly 3 million visitors. The scope of the work included sub excavation, building mechanically stabilized earth retaining walls, box culverts, rock scaling, asphalt milling and paving, guardrail work and striping. All work was accomplished while maintaining the natural beauty of the park.

    Miles Resources, of Puyallup, Wash.

    · Work on JBLM McChord Airfield Runway in Lakewood, Wash., a center pavement repair project on a 20-year-old runway at this urban military base. Full-depth repair of the center portion was followed by a 3-inch mill and overlay of the entire runway. Crews used three pavers with automatics fed by two material transfer vehicles and a total of six rollers, which helped the project earn superior scores on the California Profilograph test. This was an early season project fighting damp weather and the clock, as the government lost $1 million each day the runway was closed.

    · Work on Various Roads in King County, Wash. This urban mill-and-overlay project included 19 different locations and 34 miles of roadway all over the county, sometimes requiring an hour plus drive to the next location. The project was completed 33 days ahead of schedule, despite many of these roads being in poor condition. Crews laid roughly 95,000 tons of a newly-approved asphalt mix that contained both reclaimed asphalt pavement and recycled asphalt shingles. The project used a total of 133,050 tons of asphalt.

    Poe Asphalt Paving Inc. of Clarkston, Wash.

    · Work on Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport Runway 6-24 in Pullman, Wash. This project included reconstruction and realignment of the runway to meet C-III aircraft requirements. More than 82,000 tons of 12.5mm Superpave was placed in four lifts. The pavement on the runway is now a safe, quality surface that was completed on schedule and under budget.

    · Work on approximately 8 miles of US 95 in Latah County. The project included milling and overlay of the road as well as the installation of signs and a gabion structure and adjustment of guardrails. The company used 30 percent reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) in the project mixes, a green approach that limits the use of virgin materials, requires less energy and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

 

West Virginia

  • West Virginia Paving Inc., A CRH Co. of Dunbar, W.V.

    · Work on I-64 in White Sulphur Springs, W.V. This was a warranty project that included milling the existing roadway seven inches to the concrete level and then rubblizing the concrete. Exposed rebar was cut and removed, and soft spots were excavated and filled. The final step was asphalt paving, which included a 4-inch 25 mm Superpave base, a 3-inch 19 mm Superpave base, and a 2-inch 12.5 mm Superpave skid layer.

    · Work on I-77 in Princeton, W.V. This urban project was nine miles in length and consisted of milling the existing 8-inch roadway down to the original concrete. The concrete was then rubblized and rolled with a 50-ton profile roller. Exposed rebar was cut and removed and soft spots were excavated and filled with crushed, compacted limestone. The final step was placing nine inches of Superpave asphalt in three lifts. Traffic was managed using a barrier wall to maintain a contraflow lane and by creating an alternate route for vehicles.

    · Work on I-79 in Elkview, W.V. This rubblize and overlay project was roughly 1.5 miles long and included removing seven inches of asphalt that had been placed over concrete. The concrete roadway was then rubblized and profile rolled with a 50-ton roller. Exposed rebar was cut and removed from the roadway. Soft spots were removed and filled with crushed, compacted limestone. The final step was two lifts of separate Superpave base mixes followed by a 2-inch Superpave surface layer.

    · Work on I-79 in Servia, W.V. The existing roadway was concrete with roughly seven inches of asphalt placed as an overlay. Crews milled the asphalt down to the concrete and then rubblized the concrete and rolled it with a 50-ton profile roller. Soft spots were excavated and filled with crushed, compacted limestone fill. This was covered with a 4-inch 25 mm Superpave base, a 3-inch 19 mm Superpave base, and a 2-inch 12.5 mm Superpave skid.

    · Work on I-79 in Sutton, W.V. The existing roadway was concrete with a 7-inch overlay of asphalt. The asphalt was milled to the concrete level and then rubblized. Lifts included a 4-inch 25 mm Superpave base, a 3-inch 19 mm Superpave base, and a 2-inch 12.5 mm Superpave skid.

    · Work on West Virginia Paving Inc., A CRH Co., won the award for US 35 in Hurricane, W.V. This 14-mile rubblize-and-overlay project included a three-mile section of a six-lane highway. The existing pavement contained eight inches of asphalt placed over concrete. The asphalt was milled to the concrete, which was then rubblized and rolled with a 50-ton profile roller. Traffic was controlled with a barrier wall to maintain a contraflow lane for two out of the project's three phases.

    · Work on Raleigh County Airport Runway in Beaver, W.V. This rural airport needed one if its two runways milled and paved within a four-week time frame that included flight restrictions and weather delays. Two crews worked to reduce cold joints between pulls and were able to lay down 3,800-4,000 tons of P-401 asphalt per day. West Virginia Paving coordinated to keep the cross sections of the second runway open for incoming and outgoing flights throughout the project. Construction was completed on time and with high scores.

    Wisconsin

    Northeast Asphalt Inc., a Walbec Group Co. of Greenville, Wis.

    · Work on 6.78 miles of SH 21 in Winnebago County. The project included a mill and overlay with some curb replacements. High traffic volumes and numerous hills and curves on the road made traffic control challenging. Using a shuttle buggy and a paving ski.

    · Work on 7.38 miles of SH 49 in Green Lake County. To improve constructability and save money, the company pulverized the road for half of the project before placing an asphalt overlay; for the other half, it performed cold-in-place recycling before paving. Challenges included scheduling and traffic control. Northeast Asphalt used paving skis and a shuttle buggy to place the pavement.

    · Work on 7.74 miles of US 45 in Shawano County. The company removed 4 inches of asphalt, then pulverized and re-laid the remaining 8 inches of roadway before placing four inches of new hot-mix asphalt. The project also included replacement of a bridge structure replacement and multiple culverts. With the road open to traffic during construction, the company made a conscious effort to minimize traffic disruptions.

    Payne & Dolan Inc., a Walbec Group Co. of Waukesha, Wis.

    · Work on M-32 in Montmorency County. The work included a cold mill of the pavement and a one-course overlay with some shoulder reconstruction and widening. Careful planning and scheduling were critical since all the milled surfaces had to be repaved the same day. Despite the challenges posed by the hills and curves along this route.

    · Mill and overlay of US 2 in Iron County. Challenges included the need to schedule work around two major events, a rodeo and a fair, and the discovery of telecommunication and gas lines that weren't marked correctly on historic documents. Despite the problems.

    Rock Road Cos., of Beloit, Wis.

    · Work on US 51 in Janesville, Wis. This mill-and-overlay project was the company's first Percent Within Limits under a new Wisconsin specification. The project contained four 2,000-ton asphalt test sections using three different rubber technologies - terminal blend, terminal hybrid blend and a dry mix (engineered crumb rubber). A fourth test section contained a standard mix. The test sections exceeded bonus expectations and the final road offers a safe, smooth ride for motorists.